punkah


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  • noun

Words related to punkah

a large fan consisting of a frame covered with canvas that is suspended from the ceiling

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References in classic literature ?
Enor- mous punkahs sent from on high a gentle draught through that immaculate interior and upon our perspiring heads.
Other show stoppers at the event included moon and throne seats from Desert River; new concept rollaway beds that fold into small cabinets from Romanian company Joboloct and the Solitaire Punkah swinging ceiling fan with a wingspan of two metres, featuring 240 peacock feathers and gold finishings, which was sold on the first morning by Oliver Kessler Design.
Other show stoppers included moon and throne seats from Desert River; new concept rollaway beds that fold in to small cabinets from Romanian company Joboloct and the Solitaire Punkah swinging ceiling fan with a wingspan of 2 m, featuring 240 peacock feathers and gold finishings, which was sold on the first morning by Oliver Kessler Design.
Other show stoppers at the event include moon and throne seats from Desert River; new concept rollaway beds that fold in to small cabinets from Romanian company Joboloct; a Solitaire Punkah swinging ceiling fan with a wingspan of two metres, featuring 240 peacock feathers and gold finishings, that was sold on the first morning by Oliver Kessler Design.
George Alfred DePenning, a Civil Engineer on 3rd March, 1856 for his invention "An Efficient Punkah Pulling Machine".
They were employed as punkah wallahs, operating the fans suspended from ceilings, water carriers, floor sweepers, cooks, bakers, washerwomen and prostitutes.
To visit the Bengal Lounge, for example, is to step into a cocoon of well-worn leather chairs and sofas, dark oak paneling, tall ceilings with slow-moving punkah fans and a crackling fireplace.
Popping round the corner to help an idiot journalist is one thing; flying out to Brittany with a cold beer in one hand and a punkah in the other is entirely another.
The lounge is reminiscent of the British Raj with its lofty ceilings, old-fashioned punkah fans, large comfortable armchairs and antique spice chests of mahogany and teak.