psycho

(redirected from psychos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for psycho

References in periodicals archive ?
Surprisingly, accountancy have also been ranked among the professions least likely to attract psychos.
But identifying your psycho colleagues have just got a whole lot easier with the publication of Kevin Dutton's new book.
WHEN looking out for a workplace psycho, beware of those who:
They already have to face abuse, and much of it is based around use of terms like Psycho.
Psychos raises important issues about mental health, including the fact that doctors can suffer from mental illness, too.
But while Psychos raises crucial issues, it could be braver in its portrayal of mental illness.
We are very concerned that Channel 4 has chosen to use the word Psychos as the title for a series about mental health patients.
He said: "The term psychos is actually an ironic reference to the doctors rather than the patients.
Media Contact: Jeremy Townsend, Psycho Sorted, 9044034539, jt@psysort.
The relevance of Psycho to an analysis of the violence of mid-century American culture becomes clear when the film is examined in the context of three sociological documents that make an overt attempt to explore American culture of the times: the first, published ten years before Psycho, David Riesman's The Lonely Crowd (initially appearing in 1949); the second, published in 1959 as Hitchcock was making Psycho, C.
Focusing on camera technique and the filmic gaze, a number of critics examine issues of spectatorship in Psycho (e.
Like every first-rate novel, American Psycho functions in a way that is entirely literary.
In a recent article in Harper's Bazaar, Bret Easton Ellis looked back on his original American Psycho experience and revealed that the novel was his response to the stranglehold that political correctness had on late-'80s culture, which "may have nudged me into exploring the repressed, darker side of Patrick Bateman to an even more gruesome degree than I initially thought when I began the book.
I never thought that a movie would be made of 'American Psycho.
It seems one of the nation's actual serial killers, Paul Bernardo, had read ``American Psycho,'' and even though protests against the film took a characteristically polite tack - letters to newspapers as opposed to bullhorn-wielding throngs - many contracted locations balked at letting the film company onto their sites.