promisor


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Related to promisor: Valuable consideration, Contractual agreement
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  • noun

Synonyms for promisor

a person who makes a promise

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References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, the current regime forces promisors to exercise the
Additional recognition of defects with consent is reflected in doctrines that would excuse the promisor from performance under the contract.
Promissory estoppel is "a qualified form of equitable estoppel which applies to representations relating to a future act of the promisor rather than to an existing fact.
The Ninth Circuit has recently recognized this, explaining that a contract claim "does not seek to hold [the intermediary] liable as a publisher or speaker of third-party content, but rather as the counter-party to a contract, as a promisor who has breached.
The language of promises, promisees, and promisors saturates contract law--in decisions, statutes, and the Restatement.
As Schwartz and Sykes point out, the normative goal of any system of contract remedies is to deter inefficient breaches--those that impose greater costs on the promisee than benefits on the promisor--and to promote efficient breaches--those that impose lower costs on the promisee than benefits on the promisor.
Subsequent Contracts Will Be Allocated By Each Purchaser Promisor in Part, as Follows: Um Bucharest 02,296 for All Lots U.
A creditor beneficiary is a promisor who assumes a debt that "will satisfy an obligation of the promisee to pay money to the beneficiary.
at 86 ("[T]he promisor [may regard] it as less costly to pay damages than to meet its contract obligations unless the contract terms are modified.
probability is 40%, but now the promisor would pay 100, because there is
In Florida, to constitute valid consideration there must be either a benefit to the promisor or a detriment to the promisee.
The Step-One inquiry is whether the promisor falls into a category
t]he optimal default rule for true third-party beneficiaries is this: if a private promisee paid good consideration in exchange for a promisor's agreement to perform something for a third party with whom neither the promisee nor the promisor has a relevant contractual relationship, then that promise should be enforceable by the third party, although the parties to the contract should presumably be jointly free to vary or rescind it prior to the completion of the gift (as with other gifts).
According to the fault account duress and deception invalidate a promise just when it was wrong for the promisee to induce the promisor to promise in that way.
4 ARTHUR LINTON CORBIN, CORBIN ON CONTRACTS [sections] 984 (1951) ("[I]f a promisor so conducts himself as to make the substantial performance of his promise impossible, this is a repudiation of his promise and has the same legal effect as would a repudiation in words.