primate


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  • noun

Synonyms for primate

References in periodicals archive ?
The plesiadapiforms may have been a sort of transition animal, a link between primate ancestors and primates themselves, based on anatomy that is not quite how we understand primates to look.
The complex environment that a primate needs can never be provided in a house.
Teeth of living and extinct South American monkeys--including those of a 26-million-year-old Bolivian primate that was until now the oldest known New World primate--differ in many ways from the newly discovered teeth, the researchers say.
An international team of scientists working with primates in zoos, sanctuaries, and in the wild examined daily energy expenditure in 17 primate species, from gorillas to mouse lemurs, to test whether primates' slow pace of life results from a slow metabolism.
Primates in Peril: The World's 25 Most Endangered Primates, 2012-2014 has been compiled by the Primate Specialist Group of IUCN's Species Survival Commission (SSC) and the International Primatological Society (IPS), in collaboration with Conservation International (CI) and the Bristol Conservation and Science Foundation (BCSF).
WE RECENTLY joined more than 1,000 protestors marching from Hyde Park to Trafalgar Square calling for an end to primate experiments.
In 2007, 55% of the European Parliament voted for an end to the use of great apes and wild-caught primates followed by a phase-out of all primate experiments.
Time has also been allotted for an official welcome for the new national indigenous bishop (to be announced later this month) as well as for farewell ceremonies for the outgoing primate, Archbishop Andrew Hutchison.
William Switzer, a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and his colleagues sequenced HTLV strains from a high-risk population: people in Cameroon who reported contact with nonhuman primate tissues through hunting and butchering or keeping primate pets.
To learn more about the aye-aye, read this fact sheet from the Duke University Primate Research Center: http://primatecenter.
In her Worth Noting column (July/August 2005) Karen Ann Gajewski writes, "Hundreds of species are reportedly on the brink of becoming the first primate extinctions in nearly a century.
Our work, which was published in the July 15 issue of Science, focused on the moral issues surrounding human to nonhuman primate neural grafting.
The occurrence of simian malaria in human has signified the roles of wild primate populations in disease transmission in some malaria-endemic areas.
When our species first emerged some 100,000 to 150,000 years ago, hominids (the group containing us, our direct ancestors, and their closest relatives) were still a minor branch on the primate family tree.
Shirley McGreal, chairwoman of the International Primate Protection League (IPPL), describes these animals as "absolute viral hotbeds, little ticking time bombs.