prefer


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Synonyms for prefer

like better

Synonyms

choose

Synonyms

Synonyms for prefer

to show partiality toward (someone)

Synonyms

Synonyms for prefer

like better

Related Words

select as an alternative over another

Synonyms

Related Words

give preference to one creditor over another

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
No, thank you, I prefer to have Rebecca all to myself," said Miss Maxwell.
I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and incur my own abhor- rence.
I dare say you have seen enough of Edward to know that he would prefer the church to every other profession; now my plan is that he should take orders as soon as he can, and then through your interest, which I am sure you would be kind enough to use out of friendship for him, and I hope out of some regard to me, your brother might be persuaded to give him Norland living; which I understand is a very good one, and the present incumbent not likely to live a great while.
Because I have less confidence in my deserts than Adele has: she can prefer the claim of old acquaintance, and the right too of custom; for she says you have always been in the habit of giving her playthings; but if I had to make out a case I should be puzzled, since I am a stranger, and have done nothing to entitle me to an acknowledgment.
I'm the rake Miss Garth means; and I want to go to another concert -- or a play, if you like -- or a ball, if you prefer it -- or anything else in the way of amusement that puts me into a new dress, and plunges me into a crowd of people, and illuminates me with plenty of light, and sets me in a tingle of excitement all over, from head to foot.
I should prefer," he said, "not to discuss the matter.
Three kings protested to me, "that in their whole reigns they never did once prefer any person of merit, unless by mistake, or treachery of some minister in whom they confided; neither would they do it if they were to live again:" and they showed, with great strength of reason, "that the royal throne could not be supported without corruption, because that positive, confident, restiff temper, which virtue infused into a man, was a perpetual clog to public business.