preface

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Synonyms for preface

Synonyms for preface

to begin (something) with preliminary or prefatory material

Synonyms for preface

a short introductory essay preceding the text of a book

furnish with a preface or introduction

References in periodicals archive ?
Hemingway's prefaces exude the self-assurance of a successful
Paratexts is defined by Genette as "those liminal devices and conventions, both within the book (peritext) and outside it (epitext), that mediate the book to the reader: titles, and subtitles, pseudonyms, forewords, dedications, prefaces, intertitles, epilogues and afterwords" (Genette, 1997, p.
This essay aims to serve as a contribution to the still relatively unexplored subarea of paratext devoted to translators' prefaces, a type of document that forms part of what Maria Constanza Guzman calls the translators' 'archive,' that is, statements contained in 'prefaces, footnotes, articles, accounts of their own work, as well as annotated drafts and manuscripts, letters, interviews' which shed light 'not only on the translations themselves, but also on the relationships and fluid mappings of literature' (Guzman, 2012: 91).
After the moves analysis of the prefaces, following Swales' theoretical framework, was completed, a move structure model was proposed based on Swales' cyclical approach, which identified the steps and textual devices in the data.
The current article seeks to enhance our understanding of the authorial apparatus of early modern women's writing by examining an early example of paratextual framing in John Bale's prefaces to The Examinations of Anne Askew (1546/7).
In Dissemination (1981), Jacques Derrida opens his work with an eccentric foreword that simultaneously prefaces and deconstructs the character of the preface by drawing attention to the ambiguity inherent in a concept that at first sight appears to be straightforward:
Thanks to Christian Croisille, for the first time nineteen of Lamartine's avertissements, prefaces and propos sur la poesie et la litterature have become accessible in one impeccably edited volume.
As Galleron asserts, many of the analyses in the volume rely upon the decoding of prefaces, particularly in relation to the works that they introduce.
Paul Armstrong has argued that James's prefaces require the same "doubled reading" his novels require, that while the reader is absorbing James's account of his writing experience and his theory of writing, the reader is also responding to James as a centering consciousness whose "interpretive attitudes .
During the following months my own composition schedule also had to include the completion of shorter items that would be needed for a final, complete Holy Communion: the Salutation; the Alleluia Verse (to be printed "in place"); the short Gospel Acclamations (one of them in first draft had sounded a little like "O Canada"); the Offertory, "Let the vineyards;" the complete revision of the Prefaces and the setting of the Proper Prefaces; the two Post-Communion Canticles, "Lord, now you let your servant go in peace" and "Thank the Lord and sing his praise;" "Create in me," the optional psalm for the offering of the gifts; and the Benedictions.
Contemporary critics, however, emphasise that Scott's historical novel may well be "the direct continuation of the great social novel of the eighteenth century", as Luckacs described it (1962 [1989]: 31), and a forerunner of the Victorian novel, but what traditional critics ignored, or considered as its deficiency was a great degree of self-consciousness, most apparent in the prefaces with which Scott supplied most of his texts.
But a further reform is still needed, a fuller restoration of the lex orandi, especially the ancient collects, prefaces, and eucharistic prayers.
These prefaces were composed "in a language intended to demonstrate their [authors'] literary skills, including their knowledge of poetry, history, the [Qur.
a colored man, author of the somewhat famous book entitled 'The Garies,' published in London in 1858, with prefaces by Lord Brougham and Mrs.
She exploits the literary convention that permits an author to speak about his work in a preface while ignoring the rules of classical rhetoric that discourage prefaces as narcissistic and self-serving.