preemption


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  • noun

Synonyms for preemption

the act of taking something for oneself

Synonyms for preemption

the judicial principle asserting the supremacy of federal over state legislation on the same subject

the right of a government to seize or appropriate something (as property)

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the right to purchase something in advance of others

a prior appropriation of something

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References in periodicals archive ?
With the power of priority and preemption, first responders will no longer have to compete with non-emergency users for a connection.
Preemption is immediately available in opt-in states at no additional charge to current and future FirstNet subscribers who are primary users.
Preemption will enhance priority services already available on FirstNet.
Recognizing that preemption can cut both ways, Congress has sometimes written preemption clauses that preempt only weaker state regulations.
Chief Justice John Roberts brought up the idea of delegating preemption authority to private entities several times.
The Sixth Circuit ruled against the FCC, reversing the preemption order.
In Alice, the Court began and ended its analysis by discussing preemption, identifying "the concern that drives this exclusionary principle as one of pre-emption.
To Massumi, the juxtopostion of deterrence and preemption creates a new era in security studies.
With the preemption, Total E/P USA will be the 100% owner and operator of the assets.
The report discusses two time periods, Wave I and Wave II, when 15 of the 19 states adopted state preemption laws barring local breed-specific ordinances enacted for public safety purposes.
Administrative preemption is a convenience and contrivance for modern
3) We consider a two-stage game where, in the first stage, the countries simultaneously decide their levels of both preemption and deterrence, followed in the next stage by the organization deciding its levels of attack.
Whether in politically salient matters, like challenges to Arizona's immigration laws, or in more conventional cases, such as those in which state tort liability overlaps with federal regulation, the Court's preemption decisions reflect a highly purposive approach to reading statutes, most notably through the application of "obstacle preemption" analysis.