possessive case


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Related to possessive case: objective case
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Synonyms for possessive case

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Use the possessive case to modify nouns and gerunds (words made from verbs that act like nouns).
use the subjective, objective, and possessive cases appropriately;
Of course, the disappearance of the unruly apostrophe may be the result of having confused the role of the possessive case.
The third word, used as the illustration, has two correct uses-one, as a suffix to make a possessive case of a noun ("der"); two, as a word to mean "goal" ("dee").
The American Heritage Book of English Usage (Houghton Mifflin, 1996) opines, "Some people insist that when a gerund is preceded by a noun or pronoun, the noun or pronoun must be in the possessive case.
case--(1) the name given to different forms of nouns and pronouns: the subjective case is used for the subject of a sentence (Ivan or he), the objective case for a direct or indirect object and with prepositions (Ivan or him), and the possessive case for modifiers (Ivan's or his); (2) one of two types of letters, uppercase (or capital letters) and lowercase
4 : a form of a noun, pronoun, or adjective showing its grammatical relation to other words <The word "child's" in "the child's toy" is in the possessive case.
Bishops find it doggedly difficult, on the other hand, to control their own journalists, who are ill-impressed by patronizing remarks and who are concerned with headier stuff than the usual fare of golf vignettes, travelogues and how to address a bishop in the possessive case.
did you recall that personal pronouns in the possessive case - e.
The possessive case is used to modify nouns (for example, my brother) and words that act like nouns, such as gerunds (verbs plus-ing, such as keeping).
case--(1) the name given to different forms of nouns and pronouns; the subjective case is used for the subject of a sentence (Ivan or he), the objective case for a direct or indirect object and with prepositions (Ivan or him), and the possessive case for modifiers (Ivan's or his); (2) one of two types of letters, uppercase (capital letters) and lowercase