polygynous


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Words related to polygynous

having more than one wife at a time

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References in periodicals archive ?
Structurally the small house family resembles the traditional polygynous marital practice found in most Southern African societies.
1990: No evidence for illegitimate young in monogamous and polygynous warblers.
In polygynous marriages, the mean age difference between spouses is 15.
About 33 percent of Nigerian women had spouses who were either married to, or cohabiting with other women in polygynous relationships.
Such a polygynous colony can be formed in aquaria; isolated individuals were observed migrating into a barnacle shell cavity within an hour (Fig.
Her mother, who is no longer living, was the third wife of a polygynous man.
For their analytic sample, the researchers selected the 3,848 monogamous couples for whom complete fertility intention data were available; couples in which either partner reported being in a polygynous union or having had an extramarital relationship in the past year were excluded.
Through her analysis of global statistics, McDermott found that women in polygynous societies are exposed to higher levels of physical and sexual abuse, have greater numbers of children, are more likely to die in childbirth, have shorter lifespans, have lower levels of education, are more subject to sex trafficking and female genital mutilation, are treated less equally than men, and are more discriminated against under the law.
This species is polygynous, meaning each colony contains many queens, leading to unique caste interactions and colony dynamics.
The behavior by males was characterized as being consistent with those of a female-defense polygynous mating system.
Inter-male aggression with regard to polygynous mating system in Pampean grassland mouse, Akodon azarae (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae).
We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression.
Their colonies are polygynous, meaning they have multiple queens (as many as 40 per colony in the case of this species).
While gorillas form long-term polygynous reproductive relationships, chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans do not.
While both monogamous and polyandrous marriages exist side by side (together with, to a lesser extent, polygynous marriages) in agricultural areas of Tibet, it is clear from numerous studies that polyandrous marriage units are sought whenever possible.