pollution

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Synonyms for pollution

Synonyms for pollution

Synonyms for pollution

undesirable state of the natural environment being contaminated with harmful substances as a consequence of human activities

the state of being polluted

the act of contaminating or polluting

References in classic literature ?
It is all poverty and pollution and wretched self-complacency
His accession to the throne, or rather his usurpation of the sovereignty, a hundred and seventy-one years before the coming of Christ; his attempt to plunder the temple of Diana at Ephesus; his implacable hostility to the Jews; his pollution of the Holy of Holies; and his miserable death at Taba, after a tumultuous reign of eleven years, are circumstances of a prominent kind, and therefore more generally noticed by the historians of his time than the impious, dastardly, cruel, silly, and whimsical achievements which make up the sum total of his private life and reputation.
Or is it that you like its bitter flavor--that the clear, limpid water is insipid to your palate and that the pollution of its after-course gives it a relish to your lips?
The gardens are hidden by high mud-walls, and the paradise is become a very sink of pollution and uncomeliness.
Well, then, it must be that you think they are both weak and prone to err, and the slightest error, the merest shadow of pollution, will ruin the one, while the character of the other will be strengthened and embellished - his education properly finished by a little practical acquaintance with forbidden things.
This piece of pollution, picked up from the water-side, to be made much of for an hour, and then tossed back to her original place
When they had done this they washed their hands and feet and went back into the house, for all was now over; and Ulysses said to the dear old nurse Euryclea, "Bring me sulphur, which cleanses all pollution, and fetch fire also that I may burn it, and purify the cloisters.
The Board contended that pollutions were of importance to the inhabitants of Massachusetts because "they reach[ed] to the very foundations of the national health and prosperity" of the state.
In 1886 James Olcott in a speech before the Agricultural Board of Connecticut called on his audience and the citizens of Connecticut to "agitate, agitate" in order to "cleanse" the state of the "social evil" of the pollution "sewage from families and factories.
Holding to a view that health was related to the quality of the environment, these early water pollution reformers, mostly doctors and scientists from New England's leading families, led the movement for clean water and air.
Although these nineteenth-century pollution reformers focused on both industrial and sewage wastes, by the early years of the twentieth-century specialists in the field of water pollution concentrated almost exclusively on bacterial hazards and largely ignored the influence of industrial wastes.
Reformers came to pollution reform from a background of leadership and social involvement.
The early pollution reformers were doctors, lawyers and amateur statisticians.