pity

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Synonyms for pity

shame

Synonyms

feel sorry for

Synonyms

take pity on something or someone

Synonyms

Synonyms for pity

sympathetic, sad concern for someone in misfortune

a great disappointment or regrettable fact

to experience or express compassion

Synonyms for pity

a feeling of sympathy and sorrow for the misfortunes of others

an unfortunate development

Synonyms

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the humane quality of understanding the suffering of others and wanting to do something about it

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References in periodicals archive ?
She then speaks on behalf of an imagined other (signalled through the use of 'ooh' on line four) and gives an example of being pitied on behalf of 'what she went through' (4).
So would we all; we would all want to be pitied for such humiliation and yet, apparently, here we are playing at castles again; there is nothing directly to be owned to, nothing to be pitied in a straight sense of that word (if such a straight sense were to exist in some other, ideal linguistic register), instead there are boys' games, evasions, in this case (as in so many cases involving people who might be the avatars of Banks' suspect soldiers) murderous, or at least deathly.
22) Could it be because when he wooed her his stories caused her to pity him, and when she pitied him she cried, and as any gentle knight would do, he offered her his handkerchief to wipe her tears?
But speaking after the case yesterday, Mr Jones said he pitied his attacker.
Whole chapters tell Matisse's story, or that of the traveler Lady Montagu who was pitied by the harem dweller for the cage she wore (her corset), or the amateur documentary filmmaker from St.
Only by understanding the mechanics by which benevolence can erase its object, especially in a sentimental and colonial framework," Stevens argues, "can we see those pitied objects more accurately as people who actively sought to resist or mitigate the effects of colonization on their own cultures" (pp.