phobia


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Synonyms for phobia

Synonyms for phobia

an anxiety disorder characterized by extreme and irrational fear of simple things or social situations

References in periodicals archive ?
Needle phobia - or trypanophobia as it's also known - can differ from other types of phobias.
It could be triggered by a one-off experience - for instance, being temporarily trapped in a confined, enclosed space could lead to claustrophobia, while a social phobia can often be traced to an earlier, intensely embarrassing episode in a social situation.
We spoke to ITV This Morning's phobia experts Eva and Nik Speakman to find out what are the most common ones - and to hear advice on how you can fight your fears for good.
They published a paper on the phobia in 2013 in which they suggested a theory that aversion towards holes or hole-covered formations could be some kind of innate flight-fight response to dangerous and poisonous animals like alligators, crocodiles, snakes, who have clusters of bumps or holes on their skin.
I am doing Phobia 2, but this time it's with a male lead.
SUFFERERS of this phobia may avoid anywhere where there is a risk of seeing exposed midriffs (like the gym or swimming baths) or may be afraid of having their navel touched or having to touch another person's navel.
Strong phobia was observed in 56 %, moderate in 18 % whereas 26 % were not having phobia.
A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder where you have an excessive fear of a certain object or situation, says Raphael Rose, PhD, associate director of the Anxiety Disorders Research Center and associate clinical professor at the University of California-Los Angeles' Department of Psychology and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences.
Although social phobia may be treated with antidepressant or anti-anxiety medications, a review of 101 clinical trials published in the Sept.
The American Psychiatric Association (APA) defines phobia as a "marked fear or anxiety about a specific object or situation.
The DSM IV TR (DSM = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) diagnosis of Blood-Injection-Injury Type Specific Phobia (BII) encompasses various fears of seeing blood, receiving injections, or injury in a medical setting (APA, 2000).
Latta also includes an opening chapter explaining the concept (what differentiates mere fear or superstition from a phobia, what does and does not qualify as a phobia), and she closes the book with practical explanations of effective techniques for treating phobias and a list of resources for those who might be living with one.