performer


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  • noun

Synonyms for performer

artiste

Synonyms for performer

one who plays a musical instrument

Synonyms for performer

References in classic literature ?
And this ruthless young fellow, seizing hold of Dobbin's hand, acted over the scene, to the horror of the original performer, and in spite of Dobbin's good-natured entreaties to him to have mercy.
Nevertheless, when he did play there was no keener performer on the field, nor one more anxious to do well for his side.
He had played an excellent game of football at the university; his golf handicap was plus two; and he was no mean performer with the gloves.
To my horror and amazement, the performer of the soft little knock proved to be an exception to general rules.
The indignation of a betrayed tight-rope performer was strong within him.
I'm no great performer with the knife, but, on an occasion, could make out, myself, to cut off a slande--"
At its conclusion, the performer, a boy of nineteen or twenty, gave place to a girl; and to her accompaniment they all sang a hymn, and afterwards a sort of chorus.
Pending her changes, those aforesaid marks in his face have come and gone, now here now there, like white steps of a pipe on which the diabolical performer has played a tune.
Pickwick drew in his head again, with the swiftness displayed by that admirable melodramatic performer, Punch, when he lies in wait for the flat-headed comedian with the tin box of music.
The little man shook his head, and scratched it ruefully as he contemplated this severe indisposition of a principal performer.
The play costs the performers too much, and the audience is too cold-hearted.
During the remainder of the act the lucky performers were those whose parts required changes of dress; the others were a soaked, bedraggled, and uncomfortable lot, but in the last degree picturesque.
Tom and Joe Harper got up a band of performers and were happy for two days.
The party, like other musical parties, comprehended a great many people who had real taste for the performance, and a great many more who had none at all; and the performers themselves were, as usual, in their own estimation, and that of their immediate friends, the first private performers in England.
As the procession entered the lists, the sound of a wild Barbaric music was heard from behind the tents of the challengers, where the performers were concealed.