pen


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Synonyms for pen

Synonyms for pen

to be the author of (a published work or works)

Synonyms

to confine within a limited area

Synonyms for pen

References in classic literature ?
As to the divine Miss Sally herself, she rubbed her hands as men of business do, and took a few turns up and down the office with her pen behind her ear.
Miss Brass being by this time deep in the bill of costs, took no notice whatever of Dick, but went scratching on, with a noisy pen, scoring down the figures with evident delight, and working like a steam-engine.
When he had looked so long that he could see nothing, Dick took his eyes off the fair object of his amazement, turned over the leaves of the draft he was to copy, dipped his pen into the inkstand, and at last, and by slow approaches, began to write.
There were groups of cattle being driven to the chutes, which were roadways about fifteen feet wide, raised high above the pens.
After they had seen enough of the pens, the party went up the street, to the mass of buildings which occupy the center of the yards.
Penn and Manuel stood knee-deep among cod in the pen, flourishing drawn knives.
With a yell from Manuel the work began again, and never stopped till the pen was empty.
Lecount laid down the Draft letter from which she had been dictating thus far, and informed Noel Vanstone by a sign that his pen might rest.
She extinguished the taper, and handed him the pen again.
It is not my business to teach you to spell," said Gertrude, taking the pen.
I say it is for nothing, my friend," said Manicamp, taking up the pen again, "and you exhaust my credit.
This second place," murmured Malicorne, whilst drying his paper, "which, at the first glance appears to cost me more than the first, but " He stopped, took up the pen in his turn, and wrote to Montalais: --
Her triumph in this connexion with my work, and her delight when I wanted a new pen - which I very often feigned to do - suggested to me a new way of pleasing my child-wife.
So whilst me and Jim filed away at the pens on a brickbat apiece, Jim a-making his'n out of the brass and I making mine out of the spoon, Tom set to work to think out the coat of arms.
Then he took a look to see how me and Jim was getting along with the pens.