patronymic


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for patronymic

a family name derived from name of your father or a paternal ancestor (especially with an affix (such as -son in English or O'- in Irish) added to the name of your father or a paternal ancestor)

References in periodicals archive ?
The first instance of Adrastus' patronymic occurs after the night of the arrival of Tydeus and Polynices.
Patronymic names make up a large proportion of Scottish surnames, for example Robertson, Dickson, Jackson - and use of them lingered in parts of the Highlands well into the 1800s.
Bell is one of the more common Ulster surnames, so the task for the historian seeking to reconstruct the history of a family bearing such a patronymic over four centuries is formidable, even where, as in this case, most branches of the family remained within the well documented Quaker fold.
In fact, Joaquim Crima has also adopted a Russian patronymic, Vassily Ivanovich.
The reason Jesus used Simon's patronymic when conferring the power of the keys is not generally addressed by Scripture scholars.
Patronymic names: Robert son of Williamin time became Robert Williamson; other examples are Johnson, Peterson, Rogerson, etc.
What Meid and others have crucially failed to appreciate in making this identification is that the patronymic use of Greek -[[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] has a very close correspondent in lndic and Iranian in the suffix -ana-.
For Lejeune the name of the father, the patronymic, is both received and assumed by a self who takes responsibility for his or her name.
That is, there is no joint activity that could bring all the people of one patronymic together to do it, not even warfare.
He was not to first to cite this etymology, for Plato in his most famous work makes Socrates employ the patronymic [Greek Text Omitted], to congratulate Aristo's sons on an excellent reply.
I wish to examine the way Euripides highlights and explores this issue through a pattern that links together all the sections of the play: the pattern of patronymic reference.
On account of his patronymic, "Jacquet," a very common one in France, the artist frequently uses homonyms--the most obvious being the game of jacquet, or backgammon, which appears in his earliest works.
the full name of the participant (surname, first name, patronymic (if any), data of the identity document, including the individual entrepreneur), corresponding to the certificate registration of the participant or an extract from the trade register of the country of registration of the participant
According to Minister of Labor, Employment and Migration, the the Family Code currently is introduced amendments, which simplify the procedure for assignment and change of name and patronymic of the child.
SCOTS NAMES Patronymic names make up a large proportion of Scottish surnames, for example Robertson, Dickson, Jackson - and use of them lingered in parts of the Highlands well into the 1800s.