political party

(redirected from Party politics)
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Synonyms for political party

References in periodicals archive ?
I am hopeful that an end to a party politics would be a breath of fresh air for people in Middlesbrough.
I do think that there comes a time in the life of every nation, when people have to rise above party politics and really see the public welfare, which is intrinsic and is embodied in the heart of the Bill.
Holding regular elections becomes meaningless as soon as these elections start to lack transparency, and party politics will not be a sufficient tool for achieving democracy in a non-supportive political landscape.
Party Politics in the Western Balkans (London and New York: Routledge, 2010).
Our councillors are spending ratepayers' money on party politics (Examiner, January 3).
In a statement, Lord Pearson said: "I have learnt that I am not much good at party politics, which I do not enjoy.
CDATA[ Labor's 'rebel' MKs announce their return to party politics, but say they will not work on behalf of the coalition.
He said both the leaders should devise clear strategy to get rid of challenges confronting the nation by keeping politics on side and would have to devise national agenda beyond party politics and points scoring in the best interests of the country.
By scrapping the runners-up register, Tornaritis continued, the state was trying to reinforce party politics in schools.
He should be concentrating on helping people deal with the economic calamity that confronts us, not party politics.
Despite a general and continuing condemnation of "factionalism" on all sides, the republican period was characterized by the virulent party politics at all levels that led eventually to episodes of civil war and Mexico's near failure as a state.
To misquote GK Chesterton, when people stop believing in party politics, they don't believe in nothing--they believe in anything.
Neither does Winston James' excellent book Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia: Caribbean Radicalism in Early Twentieth Century America deal with the subject of party politics.
Those Stonewall Democrats who are really interested in pursuing gay equality rather than a career in party politics or public office are faced with a dilemma, one trumpeted by the group's name: By aligning with the Democrats, one puts the needs of that electoral machine before gay interests.
And it seems that there's another phenomenon brewing in California that could be called party politics burnout.