park


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Synonyms for park

recreation ground

Synonyms

put (down)

park yourself

Synonyms

  • sit (down)
  • perch
  • seat yourself
  • install yourself

Synonyms for park

a large area of land preserved in its natural state as public property

a facility in which ball games are played (especially baseball games)

Scottish explorer in Africa (1771-1806)

Synonyms

a lot where cars are parked

a gear position that acts as a parking brake

Related Words

place temporarily

References in classic literature ?
Far away, through a gap in the trees, I saw a second Martian, as motionless as the first, standing in the park towards the Zoological Gardens, and silent.
The dusky houses about me stood faint and tall and dim; the trees towards the park were growing black.
cried Edmund; "has she been walking as well as cutting roses; walking across the hot park to your house, and doing it twice, ma'am?
Fanny went to bed with her heart as full as on the first evening of her arrival at the Park.
The old wall running round the park kept that inclosure itself still entirely rural and romantic, and one could easily imagine that the depths of that dark forest faded away indefinitely into distant vales and hills.
To Pendragon Park, sir," said the servant, rather sombrely, and began to close the door.
In violent and extraordinary contrast with this scene of destruction, close at hand were the huge newspaper establishments of Park Row.
And so he would, if he were lord of Ashby Park--there's not a doubt of it: but the fact is, I MUST have Ashby Park, whoever shares it with me.
It's the first place after you leave the park, and must have grown while Spofford Avenue was still a country road.
He himself left the Park at the same time, strolled along Piccadilly as far as Sackville Street and let himself into his rooms.
He raised the hatch of his storm-tossed vessel and made the inquiry that cabbies do make in the park.
The cab was already at the park gate and Robert Darzac was begging Frederic Larsan to open it for him, explaining that he was pressed for time to catch the next train leaving Epinay for Paris.
About this time there drove up to an exceedingly snug and well- appointed house in Park Lane, a travelling chariot with a lozenge on the panels, a discontented female in a green veil and crimped curls on the rumble, and a large and confidential man on the box.
They come back, accompanied by Count Fosco and his wife, who propose to settle somewhere in the neighbourhood of London, and who have engaged to stay at Blackwater Park for the summer months before deciding on a place of residence.
Observant persons, accustomed to frequent the London parks, can hardly have failed to notice the number of solitary strangers sadly endeavoring to vary their lives by taking a walk.