omphalos


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  • noun

Synonyms for omphalos

a scar where the umbilical cord was attached

References in periodicals archive ?
41) Within the symbolism of Theosophy, this notion of Cosmic Evolution is imaged in the Vesica, the orifice formed between two overlapping circles, which Proudfoot claims is the central organizing principle of the intended geometry both of central Canberra, and of the building to be constructed on Capital Hill, the primary sacred site in the city itself, functioning as a kind of omphalos or caput mundi.
The site is organised into three main sections, The Rotunda, The Libyrinth and The Omphalos, which each offer different levels of access to the Modern Word's vast content.
An archetypal reading posits wells as omphalos (umbilical cords) connecting the living people in the upper world with the "loving and terrible Mother" in the underworld, almost precisely Miranda's experience when she uncovers the well at the other place and hears "[c]ircles and circles of screaming" from two long-dead mothers, Sapphira and Ophelia, and one baby daughter, Peace, issuing from the depths of the well.
After positioning the telescope on its tripod, I looked out the window at the wild-rose brambles just beyond the glass and at a field of corn whose dark-green leaves were shimmering in the August sunlight, and I was caught by the sense of a lovely strangeness that yet was familiar--a response so intense as to be astonishing, and of the kind that perhaps comes only when the outer eye perceives what the inner one, which is blind to everything but the ideal, has all along visualized as the omphalos of the universe, as its long-sought home.
This spot is really the omphalos of my world, and my mentality has turned out to be sort of microcosm of the historical and prehistoric experience of this location.
Bruce White's sword-like Samurai (anodized aluminum), Bob Fetty's free-flowing bronze Interlocking Love, and the double spiral Omphalos (painted steel), by Richard Beckman, were added to the display in Five Points Park.
Not uncommon or surprising in Parazzoli's notion of being in an existentialist landscape (das Sein, in Heidegger's primary sense of the term) are such outlandish episodes as when Circe, the sorceress, in one of her enigmatic reincarnations as someone nicknamed Omphalos (Navel), escapes Nessuno's amorous advances by vanishing into a puff of reddish dust; or when his insatiable lust for living compels Nessuno to face and eventually do away with his own double, who has dared to confront him, in turn, with apocalyptic nightmares.
There is no omphalos, no point of geographic convergence, no navel linking earth to heaven.
The point is that we wouldn't know, if it weren't for Miss Brown's invaluable magazine, that Gloucester was hip, if not necessarily "the artistic omphalos of the United States.
There were posters (for sale) on the wall of Plymouth Rock, the Stone of Scone and the Omphalos of Gala at Delphi.
Thus, Cook takes the omphalos (navel or center) orientation as definitive of the epic and shows how that orientation is questioned in the Iliad, revised in the Odyssey, and increasingly rendered more complex by succeeding epics: the Aeneid, Orlando Furioso, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost.
The resonant epithet omphalos establishes Zion's higher status.
Edmund summarizes Omphalos as follows: "That there had been no gradual modification of the surface of the earth, or slow development of organic forms, but that when the catastrophic act of creation took place, the world presented, instantly, the structural appearance of a planet on which life had long existed" (86-7).
Die flachen, profilierten Schalen sind fur das westliche Billendorf ganzlich untypisch und die dunnwandige Feinkeramik besteht vornehmlich aus Schalen mit Omphalos (Peschel 1990, 53).
Dating from the 2nd-century-AD, it is believed to be a Roman interpretation of a Greek prototype such as the severe-style Omphalos Apollo, usually attributed to the mid 5th-century BC sculptor Kalamis.