References in periodicals archive ?
1999) "Consumption and the problem of variety: cultural omnivorousness, social distinction and dining out" Sociology, 33(1): 105-27.
Wilson's own intellectual omnivorousness sadly contributed to the demise of the critical excellence he once represented; he spat out a lot of dubious matter after a taste, but he swallowed plenty.
Lebedev argued that advertisements were absolutely necessary so that film consumers could avoid the "sickness of omnivorousness," (66) and the sociologist I.
As Americans publicly disdain snobbism and embrace meritocracy, the "democratic ideology" of omnivorousness fuels the notion that arbitrary standards of culinary distinction based on a "single, elite French notion of culture are unacceptable.
Clarke writes from an ostensible belief that "universal experience"--knowing, being, and doing with a Goethean omnivorousness and unconstraint--is perilous for anyone in temporal life, but his implied reference is to a sexual urgency that interfused itself with Fuller's hunger for knowledge and made her a transgressor of New England morality (it was widely rumored that Fuller married Angelo Ossoli only after she became pregnant by him, if at all) as well as of New England thought.
Its author's wide-eyed intellectual omnivorousness is in a way more American than European.
from the hills a full-throated song of omnivorousness.
Regulars will know of this column's admiration for the uncritical omnivorousness of the Dutch site a-matter at www.
Vondung's reader benefits from the vast panorama of the motif he sketches in the book and from the numerous parallels and rich allusions; but the inclination towards a certain omnivorousness is hard to miss: almost every conceivable fact and detail of German culture proves related to the apocalyptic in Vondung's interpretation.
In this sense, their tastes do appear to exhibit the classic features of omnivorousness.