omega-6 fatty acid


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Related to omega-6 fatty acid: omega-3 fatty acid
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Synonyms for omega-6 fatty acid

a polyunsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has its first double valence bond six carbons from the beginning

References in periodicals archive ?
Flaxseed oil is rich in the A omega-3 fatty acid ALA (alpha-linoleic acid), while black currant, borage and evening primrose oils are good sources of the omega-6 fatty acid GLA.
The study also showed that, as the ratio of omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3s increases, so does the risk for hip fracture.
1: Dietary sources and enzymatic conversion pathways of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid precursors.
Omega-6 fatty acids include the essential linoleic acid (LA), found mainly in corn oil, soybean oil, and some seeds.
The view that omega-6 fatty acids are primarily pro-inflammatory fails to consider the complex nature of omega-6 fatty acid metabolism.
Gamma linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid with health benefits that are similar and complementary to the benefits of the fish oil derived omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA.
New guidelines establish for the first time recommended levels of two types of polyunsaturated fatty acids, alphalinolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, and linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid.
Gamma linolenic acid is an omega-6 fatty acid with health benefits that are similar and complementary to the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.
ALA and linoleic acid (LA) - an omega-6 fatty acid - are the only true "essential" fatty acids.
GLA, an omega-6 fatty acid, is an intermediate in human metabolism and serves as a precursor for a number of biologically active molecules vital to the maintenance of membrane structure and normal cell signaling.
In "Restoring the Tissue Omega-3: Omega-6 Fatty Acid Balance to Optimize Health," William E.
Sixty-seven adults (mean age, 42 years) with chronic headaches (93% of which were migraines) occurring a mean of 23 days per month were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 intensive dietary interventions for 12 weeks: a diet low in omega-6 fatty acids and high in omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) or a diet low in omega-6 fatty acids and containing the low amount of EPA and DHA present in a typical US diet.
A study by Duke University researchers published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases found that mice fed omega-3 fatty acid supplements had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids, suggesting that certain dietary fats, and not simply body weight, can lead to osteoarthritis.
OMEGA-6 fatty acids are more prevalent in farmed fish than in wild fish, a State Laboratory study comparing the two types of fish has shown.
The study also showed that as the ratio of omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3s increased, so did the risk for hip fracture.