ocellated turkey


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Related to ocellated turkey: Meleagrididae
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Synonyms for ocellated turkey

wild turkey of Central America and northern South America

References in periodicals archive ?
The funny thing about the Ocellated turkey is that it is the oddest, most un-turkey-like bird of the six turkey subspecies.
I called my buddy CJ Davis at Montana Decoy and told him I needed some Ocellated turkey decoys.
CJ, thanks for the Ocellated turkey decoys, but they look way too large," I said.
But since I had never seen an Ocellated turkey in person before, I really wasn't a reliable source.
My non-bilingual guide pointed excitedly, and I think he was either confirming that the noise was indeed a Sasquatch, or trying to explain that the odd sound was an Ocellated turkey.
I MENTIONED in a previous column that this past spring I was going to bite the broadhead and plunk down the money to go after Ocellated turkeys in the Yucatan Peninsula.
The annual burning of pastures affects the breeding of some birds, especially the ocellated turkey.
The Ocellated turkey looks really nothing like the other subspecies.
A serious turkey hunter might disagree, because the Yucatan is also home to the brightly feathered ocellated turkey.
The ocellated turkey does follow the same springtime mating ritual as its northern cousins, so March and April are the right time for turkey and also the best times for a combination hunt.
The ocellated turkey has a different gobble than our more familiar birds, brittle and more staccato, but when you hear its call through the predawn forest you'll know it's a turkey.
Instead, the ocellated turkey is usually stalked, preferably at dawn but also at dusk, which is exactly the way the big trophy grouse of Europe, the capercaillie, is hunted.
He was the first ocellated turkey I had seen up close, and I was stunned at how beautiful he was, truly a treasure from the land of the Mayans.
During the spring of 2011, I headed south to the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in search of ocellated turkeys with a bow.
Our driver stopped unexpectedly to allow a pair of brightly plumed ocellated turkeys to cross the path.