nervous


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Related to nervous: nervous breakdown, nervous system
  • adj

Synonyms for nervous

Synonyms for nervous

in a state of anxiety or uneasiness

feeling or exhibiting nervous tension

Synonyms for nervous

easily agitated

Related Words

causing or fraught with or showing anxiety

of or relating to the nervous system

Synonyms

excited in anticipation

Synonyms

Related Words

unpredictably excitable (especially of horses)

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
He says that with my imaginative power and habit of story-making, a nervous weakness like mine is sure to lead to all manner of excited fancies, and that I ought to use my will and good sense to check the tendency.
My own nervous system is an exceptionally sensitive one.
I wasn't a bit alarmed before, but now I'm as nervous as can be.
There is a tomb in Shepperton churchyard, however, with a poem on it, and I was nervous lest Harris should want to get out and fool round it.
And though one never thinks any one good enough for the people one's fond of, he has the kindest, truest instincts, I'm sure, and though he seems nervous and his manner is not commanding, I only think these things because it's Katharine.
Two nervous sentries paced their beats, their eyes rolling often toward the impenetrable shadows of the gloomy jungle.
I confess, he makes me nervous around the children," she said.
She had been nervous and irritable all the morning; and we took her out into the garden to breathe the fresh air.
He made a long pause, plainly overcome by the thought that was in him, and nervous how best to express it.
I'm not one single bit nervous," said Felicity complacently.
Then Billina gave several loud "cluck-clucks" that seemed to make the fat little King MORE nervous than ever, and marched through the entrance into the enchanted palace.
In the nervous irritability of the moment, Lady Janet resented the servant's appearance as a positive offense on the part of the harmless man.
First, there was Lloyd Inwood, tall, slender, and finely knit, nervous and dark.
The physiologist can discover that both depend upon the nervous system, and he may find that the movements which we call voluntary depend upon higher centres in the brain than those that are reflex.
Hygeia herself would have fallen sick under such a regimen; and how much more this poor old nervous victim?