musical mode


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Synonyms for musical mode

References in periodicals archive ?
Ascribing to one's preference of musical mode a portent of individual emotional sensibility, Le Jeune invites his "companions to honor music of serious rationales, of serious notes and measures, in order to convince the most prudent of neighboring nations that our flightiness and changes have run their course; that a firm harmony is established in our hearts, and that the peace that is supported on our constancies is a lasting tranquility, not a temporary calm" (pt.
Originally having the literal meaning of 'joining together', in the sixth century harmonia [1] began to describe musical notes united in a system of concord [Pythagorean numbers theory], [2] the act of tuning a musical instrument, [3] and the various musical modes such as the Dorian, Phrygian, and Lydian modes" (11).
Originally having the literal meaning of 'joining together,' in the sixth century harmonia [1] began to describe musical notes united in a system of concord [Pythagorean numbers theory], [2] the act of tuning a musical instrument, [3] and the various musical modes such as the Dorian, Phrygian, and Lydian modes" (11).
The feminine, sheltered, Western Rosalind of the court and the slightly (and always only briefly) androgynous but more independent and worldly Rosalind of the forest are delineated by the use of different musical modes and instruments that while understated and often very similar in range are easy to hear even for experiants with no special musical knowledge.
However complex the implications of the setting are, the concept of a fantasy Japan does provide Doyle with the opportunity to use a number of Eastern instruments in the score, including the koto, finger cymbals, taiko drums, and gongs, as well as several different musical modes, departing from the Western tonal harmonic language used in the majority of films.
Since the late eighteenth century, Indian music has met with a keen interest among western scholars, like the British Orientalist Sir William Jones, who in 1792 published his essay On the Musical Modes of the Hindus.
The study of Ragamala pictures is somewhat complex for they employ a wide variety of visual imagery to represent the musical modes.
These Pahari Ragamala sets portray the visual imagery of sound or the sources of voice described in verses 98 to 109 in Kshemakarna's Ragamala, ignoring the dhyanas (iconographical forms) of musical modes conceived by him.
If I had to take one home, it would have been the Os Justi, reinventing ancient musical modes for contemplation of the 19th century.
Waelrant, moreover, did not hesitate to write cross relations between parts, to require (for instance) an F and an F# in the same melodic phrase, or to mix hallmarks of different musical modes in the same composition.
Of particular importance to the reader unfamiliar with this music is the discussion of maqamat, Arabic musical modes that form the basis for the melodies of pizmonim and melodies from other liturgically based traditions.
Jones translated a medieval treatise on music and wrote an essay entitled On the Musical Modes of the Hindus.
Popular has generally meant commercially successful, electronically amplified, modern, and widely desirable and accessible to a large audience; traditional has evoked nonelectric, nonurban, ceremonial, or supposedly fixed, historically stable musical modes.
59), Alpers misses the chance to consider how the literary use of the term, however vague it may be, relates to the long history of the claim that various musical modes (harmoniai in the ancient Greek world) excite or represent various emotions.