bonding

(redirected from mother-infant bonding)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for bonding

a close personal relationship that forms between people (as between husband and wife or parent and child)

(dentistry) a technique for repairing a tooth

fastening firmly together

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Intermittent phototherapy will also help in maintaining mother-infant bonding, and breast feeding, and through this it will help in achieving well-nourished and healthy babies.
We instituted a mother-infant bonding program for our cesarean deliveries a few months ago in response to patient requests.
She then considers the process of labor and delivery in human and other mammals, the state of the newborn infant, behavioral interactions during the immediate postpartum period, and mother-infant bonding, drawing on her own research, including a study of 110 women who delivered with midwives, and that from other fields.
Mother-infant bonding is important, but safety is paramount if a mother is psychotic--especially if she is experiencing psychotic thoughts about her infant.
Studies of antenatal depression and its consequences led the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to issue the following guideline statement in November 2007: "Maternal psychiatric ill-ness, if inadequately treated or untreated, may result in poor compliance with prenatal care, inadequate nutrition, exposure to additional medications or herbal remedies, increased alcohol and tobacco use, deficits in mother-infant bonding, and disruptions within the family environment.
Maternal psychiatric illness, if inadequately treated or untreated, may result in poor compliance with prenatal care, inadequate nutrition, exposure to additional medications or herbal remedies, increased alcohol and tobacco use, deficits in mother-infant bonding, and disruptions within the family environment.
Bed sharing (also called "co-sleeping" and "family bed") has become increasingly common, partly because it can facilitate breastfeeding and promote mother-infant bonding.
Inadequately treated depression also poses prenatal and neonatal risks, including increased rates of fetal growth retardation, preterm delivery, operative delivery, and mental retardation, as well as decreased Apgar scores and altered mother-infant bonding, he said.