modernity

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Synonyms for modernity

Synonyms for modernity

the quality of being current or of the present

References in periodicals archive ?
The simultaneous presence of these two modernities, and the melancholic lament for a decadent or lost reality that was disappearing with the advances of progress, are symptomatic of these tragic authors.
Consider also that actors illustrating and espousing alternative forms of Islamic modernities can be shown to have, for example, bureaucratic procedures and manuals for carrying out banking activities, which also exist in Western banking practice.
Daedalus, Special Issue on Early Modernities, 127:3 (Summer, 1998).
edu/clcweb/vol12/iss2/10> Ikram Masmoudi discusses arrival as an occasion to take stock of comparative modernities.
Thus Lost Modernities is not just a sharp critique against Eurocentric conceit.
This also means not turning way from but unraveling prudently the singular stipulations of an exclusive modernity as shaping the contentions and concatenations of all modernities, stipulations that are nonetheless set to work in different ways by social subjects to yield expected outcomes and unexpected consequences.
In general, Other Modernities offers insightful analyses of many important issues in post-socialist China and initiates an interesting dialogue about the contents of modernity.
If modernity is defined as the modernity of Western cities, there are also "diverging" modernities, situated "on the periphery.
Yack sees postmodernism as partially responsible for painting a picture of modernity as a monolithic whole, thereby reducing it to nothing less than a "fetishism of modernities.
Eisnstadt research program for multiple modernities initiated, demonstrating that his switch of the sociological theory has taken effect in the global sociological community.
MULTIPLE MODERNITIES AND POSTSECULAR SOCIETIES brings together the two recently much discussed concepts in its title and explores them through a number of case studies.
They cover transnational and border-zone modernities, nation-states and citizenship, and cultural and moral orientations.
It is therefore at least theoretically possible to envisage alternatives to 'modernity' as we have received it or, even more plausibly, multiple modernities.
He thus presents modernity as a struggle over ideas and principles in the course of which central problems of human social life need to be addressed and considers the cases of Brazil and South Africa as illustrative of the plurality of modernities.
To celebrate, and especially to anticipate, symmetrical alternative modernities is to ratify the Truman Doctrine translated into a new social scientific sublime' (p.