moat


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Related to moat: Economic Moat
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Synonyms for moat

ditch dug as a fortification and usually filled with water

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References in classic literature ?
What do we want of a moat when we're going to snake him out from under the cabin?
The flag had been struck, and the gun had been fired, at the right moment of time, and I felt as snugly cut off from the rest of Walworth as if the moat were thirty feet wide by as many deep.
Soon we came to a moat with a drawbridge, where we were met by the rattling of arms and the hoarse challenge of a sentry.
The strand of that island was its first boundary wall, the Seine its first moat.
Then, in the brightness of the morning, the drawbridge fell across the moat with a rattle and clank of chains, the gate of the castle swung slowly open, and a goodly array of steel-clad men-at-arms, with a knight all clothed in chain mail, as white as frost on brier and thorn of a winter morning, came flashing out from the castle courtyard.
These shoes," it ran, "were dug up in the moat of Holdernesse Hall.
Together they buried the knights at the bottom of the dry moat at the back of the ruined castle.
So the Delegation was cast into the deepest dungeon beneath the moat, where it maintained a divided mind for many weeks, but finally reconciled its differences and asked to be taken before the New President.
A broad moat, a high outer wall turreted at the corners, with a great black keep towering above all--so it lay before them in the moonlight.
A deep moat lay in front of our door, but the water was in places nearly dried up, and it could easily be crossed.
The baron sharpened it again, and made another offer, when his hand was arrested by a loud screaming among the young barons and baronesses, who had a nursery in an upstairs tower with iron bars outside the window, to prevent their tumbling out into the moat.
an island, which may be compared to a castle situated on the summit of a lofty submarine mountain, protected by a great wall of coral-rock, always steep externally and sometimes internally, with a broad level summit, here and there breached by a narrow gateway, through which the largest ships can enter the wide and deep encircling moat.
In the remote earliest form of the stories, as Celtic myths, this supernatural element was no doubt frank and very large, but Malory's authorities, the more skeptical French romancers, adapting it to their own age, had often more or less fully rationalized it; transforming, for instance, the black river of Death which the original heroes often had to cross on journeys to the Celtic Other World into a rude and forbidding moat about the hostile castle into which the romancers degraded the Other World itself.
In the first place, the Grange is on clay, and built where the castle moat must have been; then there's that destestable little river, steaming all night like a kettle.
It's all very well your saying that a man escaped by wading this moat, but what I ask you is, how did he ever get into the house at all if the bridge was up?