mediocre


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References in periodicals archive ?
Thursday's report, based on the group's analysis of Federal Highway Administration data, found that 56 percent (1,754 miles) of principal arterial roadways in Los Angeles and Orange counties are rated poor, while 36 percent (1,336 miles) are rated mediocre.
Mark Pearson, OECD deputy director of employment, labour and social affairs, said the lower than average level of public investment in healthcare was mirrored by a "somewhat mediocre performance across the board and in healthcare "you get what you pay for".
The irony about the film lies not in the fact that it is an utterly mediocre mess.
David Cameron says he's waging an all-out war on mediocre schools.
I'M afraid that whoever United appoint as coach they will be at best mediocre.
Listen to it below and one will realize that the track is not mediocre at all and has the potential to become another chartbuster.
While commenting on the issue, writer Will Heilpern wrote in the university's newspaper 'The Tab' that normally students need A* at A-level to gain entry in the university, whilst the Prince only achieved a mediocre ABC.
Most producers don't keep good records of their weekly activities, and the usual reason is simple--the producer doesn't want to see his or her mediocre weekly performance reflected on a piece of paper.
The life expectancy and experienced well-being of Pakistan was found to be mediocre, but the ecological footprint was termed "good".
As most of the racing programme is made up of mediocre contests I would be interested in which parts Peter Burdon (Chatroom, yesterday) would like to relieve us from watching.
A lousy targeting system coupled with deadly dull boss battles and bland environments unfortunately results in gameplay that rarely hovers above the mediocre.
The proper response to a blizzard of mediocre politicians is not more mediocre politicians
These new, mediocre plans place it firmly back on its current trajectory: heading straight for Nowheresville.
The third novel by the American satirist introduces Milo Burke as a mediocre man in a mediocre academic development job in which he must raise money for the university he works for.
It's bad enough that people like Len Goodman praise the mediocre, but for goodness sake, what does Miss Dixon know about ballroom dancing?