medieval

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Synonyms for medieval

Synonyms for medieval

relating to or belonging to the Middle Ages

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as if belonging to the Middle Ages

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characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Ages

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References in periodicals archive ?
And, curiously enough, in the mid-Renaissance, rhetoric and floridity were drawn out of the very Greek and Latin revival that had freed the world from mediaevalism and Aquinas.
I believe that if one man were to live his life out fully and completely, were to give form to every feeling, expression to every thought, reality to every dream,--I believe that the world would gain such a fresh impulse of joy that we would forget all the maladies of mediaevalism, and return to the Hellenic ideal,--to something finer, richer, than the Hellenic ideal, it may be.
It shows, depending on your viewpoint, either that Yahweh endorsed the new Jewish State, or that the secular socialist values of Israel's founding fathers were more than a match for the chaotic mediaevalism of the loose Arab coalition which threatened it.
Like Kirsch's The Passions of Shakespeare's Tragic Heroes, this is an "old-fashioned book" insofar as its discursive frame of reference for the culture, ideas, and preoccupations of Shakespeare and his contemporaries looks to the past, drawing upon the texts of antiquity and late mediaevalism rather than the socio-political conditions and the philosophical ferment which appeal to new historicists, cultural materialists and deconstructionists in their quest for the sensibility and experience which formed the early modem period.
The only thing the new period will have in common with mediaevalism will be the subordination of man to certain absolute values.
The New Mediaevalism edited by Marina Brownlee, Kevin Brownlee and Stephen G Nichols (Johns Hopkins University Press) uses techniques from different social science disciplines - a bit of deconstruction, a touch of Lacan - to refresh dry history.
Having spent the entire article nicely demolishing the antirationalist mediaevalism that Drieu there argues for in reaction against the withering of the body and the death of the individual, De Man ends by noting the book's uncontestable value as a "profession de foi": more important than Drieu's methods, are "l'elan et la conviction avec lesquels cet ecrivain se lance a l'assaut de la creation d'un type humain radicalement nouveau.
He did not at that time see that mediaevalism was as dead as a fern-leaf in a lump of coal; that other developments were shaping in the world around him, in which Gothic architecture and its associations had no place.