matriarchy


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Synonyms for matriarchy

a form of social organization in which a female is the family head and title is traced through the female line

References in periodicals archive ?
False: Elephants and lions are among the other animals that also live in a matriarchy.
Yet some theoreticians of the matriarchy went even further by accusing Judaism of destroying a matriarchal system which, some scholars claimed, pre-dated monotheism and ended up blaming Jews for the Shoah.
Patriarchy versus matriarchy, industrial farming against organic, a desire to conquer death and an understanding that death and life go hand in hand.
Whereas this early poem by Mullen celebrates (black) female self-affirmation ([she] "made herself / from wind and earth") and boundless strength ("Her arms surround the sky"), Martin's poem refuses this gesture, which has too often been conflated with the superwoman trope of black matriarchy.
We show a strong matriarchy where these women are not defined by the men in their lives.
This rise of a money matriarchy marks not just a shift in the balance of power in families but may have more positive impacts for the future economy.
This matriarchy was dominated by strong-minded women like Harry's mother-in-law, my aunt Lily, stubborn and spiky as a Russian peasant, and Harry's wife Pauline, a force of nature, who had crisp reactions to everyone she knew.
Marine scientist Elayne Looker said, "Whales follow a system of matriarchy.
Header's conception of dance as an almost primeval mode of communication -- the "first language in the world" -- works well thematically with his portrayal of Egypt's ancient matriarchy.
Those most concerned seemed fearful that American society may be on the verge of becoming a matriarchy.
Greg Coughlan, head of savings at Bank of Scotland, said: "This rise of a money matriarchy marks not just a shift in the balance of power in families but may have more positive impacts for the economy.
In the relatively laisse-faire years prior to the imposition of apartheid regulations after 1950, there was something close to matriarchy in the urbanised community as women often controlled the properties and managed the finances.
Goettner-Abendroth, a former philosophy professor turned social theorist, makes the case for reclaiming the concept of matriarchy and the scientific study of the social patterns properly associated with it.