mastoiditis


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Words related to mastoiditis

inflammation of the mastoid

References in periodicals archive ?
It represents a case of disseminated blastomycosis with mastoiditis, and epidural and posterior auricular subcutaneous abscess as the presenting sign.
Resurgence of mastoiditis has been seen in recent years, possibly due to stringent antibiotic prescribing in primary care over the last decade (Antonelli et al, 1999).
This adult male had what appears to be chronic mastoiditis, a lytic lesion in a vertebral fragment, and three separate and distinct indentions on the parietal bones.
The analysis of more than 3 million records from 162 British practices over 10 years found that the risk of mastoiditis after otitis media, peritonsillar abscess after sore throat, and pneumonia after upper respiratory infection was too low to justify antibiotics (BMJ 2007 Oct.
Less commonly, the bacterium can seed into the bloodstream because of parotitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, otitis and dental infections (13).
It also is an important cause of acute otitis media, which if left untreated, may lead to more serious diseases such as mastoiditis and meningitis.
Other, less frequent causes include penetrating trauma, vertebral osteomyelitis, parotitis, mastoiditis and sinusitis.
Affected patients present with otitis media, sinusitis, and low-grade pneumonia, not the osteomyelitis, mastoiditis, recurrent consolidating pneumonias, and other severe infections emphasized in older textbooks.
Workup involves obtaining a coagulation panel to nile out hypercoagulation states; reviewing CT or MRI to rule out mastoiditis and intracranial abscess; obtaining sodium, potassium, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels to rule out dehydration; and reviewing current medications and recent medical conditions to rule out etiology related to hormone use, pregnancy, or puerperium.
1) It is usually caused by direct extension of a pre-existing infection, such as sinusitis, mastoiditis, otitis media, or prior craniotomy.
The infection spread into her inner ear, causing the bone to get inflamed and the development of mastoiditis which has left her struggling to hear.
Physicians usually prescribe antibiotics because untreated ear infections may have serious complications such as mastoiditis or meningitis (infection of bone or brain).
Recurrent therapy resistant mastoiditis by Mycobacterium cheilonaeabscessus, a nontuberculous mycobacterium.