mannerism


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  • noun

Synonyms for mannerism

Synonyms for mannerism

artificial behavior adopted to impress others

Synonyms for mannerism

a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual

a deliberate pretense or exaggerated display

References in periodicals archive ?
All of these mannerisms are unnatural which suggests that the perpetrators think that it is somehow clever to talk this way, perhaps copying the American and Australian actors from whom they originate.
Previous generations have implicitly described it as Florence's autumn, lauding the intervening years and dismissively identifying 16th-century Mannerism as a decadent decline followed only by the icy blasts of Cigoli, Cortona and later grand-ducal collecting.
PK is referred to as " namoona " and a " sample" to the world which closely resembles Gump's ' painfully slow' mannerism.
It also acts as an orientation with regard to court mannerism.
As I learned from watching her teach, she was adamantly opposed to forcing young bodies prematurely and a demon at squelching any signs of affectation, mannerism, or exaggeration.
I go on just mannerism and what comes to me comedically in terms of attitude and play it that way," Ferrell says.
Mannerism is primarily associated with the human form as it appears in sculpture and painting (although the term is also extended to architecture and literature).
5 billion--Ahmanson nevertheless had to struggle with "social awkwardness, odd mannerism and the awareness of being somehow different," reports the newspaper.
Elsewhere, he uses another current mannerism, a thin bold frame wrapping itself around the long horizontal house, like a frame around a picture.
As the cycle repeats, the film's tone shifts inevitably from naturalism to mannerism, foregrounding the actors' discrepant nuancing of the dialogue and shortcomings such as the theater training that surfaces in the American's exaggerated facial expressions.
Some musicologists have posited if not a period, at least a stylistic tendency analogous to mannerism in art; there is no discussion of that here.
He thus aimed to 'avoid terms like Renaissance or Mannerism because they obscure the stylistic diversity of sixteenth-century architecture'.
Regarding the virtual disappearance of the Florentine tondo around 1520-25, she notes that for a variety of complex reasons, including religious unrest of the Reformation and the onset of Mannerism, it lost the vital cultural connota tion it had held for Florentines during the Renaissance.
Since the early twentieth century, Goltzius's reputation has been wrapped up with that of Mannerism, itself a supposedly malformed, anticlassical phenomenon rehabilitated only in the 1920s by expressionist historians like Max Dvorak and Max Friedlander.
Barbaro was convinced, Prank adds, that the use of the pseudo-theatricality of antiquity and the allegorization of the ancient myths was so widespread that it impacted on the very mannerism and sermons of the clergy.