malefactor

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Synonyms for malefactor

one who commits a crime

Synonyms for malefactor

References in periodicals archive ?
After all, they have broken the rules by which the rest of us abide and while we hope, perhaps forlornly, that they'll reform, we need to see them making reparation for their malefactions.
Noting that he has "heard / That guilty creatures sitting at a play / Have by the very cunning of the scene / Been strook so to the soul, that presently / They have proclaim'd their malefactions," Hamlet resolves to "observe [his uncle's] looks," and if "'a do blench" he will "know [his] course" (II.
But Norma Landau's essay persuasively argues that it was not their well-publicized malefactions per se that led to their downfall so much as their unseemly dedication to judicial business.
I have heard That guilty creatures sitting at a play Have, by the cunning of the scene, Been struck so to the soul that presently They have proclaim'd their malefactions.
In sum, there is a danger that both the media and conservatism are becoming tools of a plutocracy, creating a climate of opinion favorable to extending the hegemony of organized money, marginalizing dissenters and critics, and blinking at the malefactions of the rich and powerful.
Even Jane Austen's portrayals of life among the lesser gentry are strangely dominated by the benefactions and malefactions of the upper nobility, Darnley in Pride and Prejud ice, for example.
We asked Lee Drutman and Charlie Cray from Citizen Works to review the 2002 accounting and financial malefactions in a separate article, which appears after this one.
182) In the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson detailed several dozen malefactions of King George and then emphasized that the King had refused the many petitions of the American colonies:
The Framers discerned fundamental principles through struggles against particular malefactions of the Crown; the struggle shapes the particular contours of the articulated principles.
When Hillary Clinton went on the Today show in early 1998 to defend her husband against the malefactions of a "vast right-wing conspiracy," she was pitied and disparaged in roughly equal measure.