loathly


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Synonyms for loathly

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John Lawson's The Loathly Lady inhabits that familiar terrain of the sword-and-sorcery fantasy.
A secular parallel (from Chaucer's Wife of Bath's Tale) is the reformed knight's address to the loathly lady as 'My lady and my love, and wif so dere'), though, of course, critics have found his act of submission 'suspect' also.
Various common or standard themes or tropes also figure: Chastity test (7), Loathly Lady (37), Love potion (53), May babies (6), Poisoned apple (6), Wasteland (21), and "What women want" quest, which follow immediately The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnell.
In Celtic versions of the loathly lady story, the husband who possesses the "old hag" gains sovereignty of the kingdom.
5) The twist that Chaucer gives to this story is that the loathly lady does not transform automatically as in Gower's story, but she controls the transformation herself.
The Thing is the Loathly Worm of medieval ballads and a version of the post-modern artworks Byatt likes to invent, but it is also, because it is so concretely imagined, incontrovertibly material, present, real.
But one might acknowledge that truth, so we were taught, without rushing to embrace its loathly absolute, the pernicious doctrine that only selfhood matters and that works of literature, like all other externals, are grist to the egoistic mill.
and the Loathly Lady is beauty masquerading as ugliness.
Lucan's cannibalistic night-witch Erichto ("Terribilis Stygio") - "haggard and loathly with age .
The frog becomes the prince; Lucius the ass [yes, another Lucius] in Apuleius, becomes Lucius the initiate of Isis; the Wife of Bath's loathly lady, having got what she wanted, becomes a beautiful lady.
He is optimistic that it will be made, as he believes there is a ready-made audience, though he doubts that the provisional title, The Loathly Worm of Lombton, will survive.
There were of course in the era of Empire two Colombos, that of the expatriate imperial ruling class, `of lovely homes and gardens'--the Galle Face Hotel, the Cinnamon Gardens, Mt Lavinia--and that of the `natives'; `that of the cool, airy bungalows where one does live, and the loathly hovels where one doesn't live'.
9 See, for example, 2 Henry IV, 'The people fear me; for they do observe / Unfather'd heirs and loathly births of nature' (IV.
These appear most dramatically as forbidden words and an uninflected treatment of loathly subjects.
Frequently it recalls to me the Loathly Damsel of medieval legend, who was repellent at first encounter but who, when embraced, changed into a girl of inexhaustible charm, wisdom, and beauty.