linguistic atlas


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Synonyms for linguistic atlas

an atlas showing the distribution of distinctive linguistic features

References in periodicals archive ?
The source year of the earliest map in the sample (documented as 1741; Lameli 2010) predates the major early linguistic atlas efforts that took place in the late nineteenth century (Crystal 1997) and gives weight to the historical presence of spatial depictions of language.
The Geography of Speech: Plans for a Linguistic Atlas of the United States and Canada.
In the linguistic atlas of the Finnic languages, the linguistic maps prepared by Tiit-Rein Viitso and his explanations stand out by richness of historical phonological and morphological information.
Linguistic Atlas of England: M20/21; Viereck 1975: M93; Gachelin 1991: 223).
Still, nonstandard weren't does not seem to have disappeared altogether from New England, since Atwood (1953: 32) reports a few scattered attestations from the 1930s in the Linguistic Atlas of New England (Kurath et al.
On the site of the former brewery in central urban location of a new research building at the Philipps-University is to be built for the German Linguistic Atlas.
These advances are, above all, connected with LALME and its daughter project, the Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English (henceforth LAEME).
The Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English (LAEME, ongoing work) forms, together with the Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots, the Edinburgh Medieval Atlas Projects, ongoing at the Institute for Historical Dialectology, University of Edinburgh.
1993 Catalogue of sources for a Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English.
I would like to present some maps from our computer developed linguistic Atlas of England (Viereck and Ramisch 1991, 1997) for which the data were taken from Harold Orton's Survey of English Dialects, published between 1962 and 1971.
1991, 1997 The computer developed linguistic atlas of England.
The ALE can be called a linguistic atlas of the fourth generation, being preceded by regional and national atlases as well as by atlases of language groups.
The methodology follows the original guidelines established by McIntosh and Samuels in conjunction with the production of A linguistic atlas of Late Mediaeval English (1986, 1: 7).
The team of the Linguistic atlas of Late Mediaeval English analysed some folios of this manuscript, which also includes other writings by Richard Rolle, like The Form of Living, Olium efusum and Ihesu swete now wole iche syng, and came to the conclusion that, because of the linguistic features of the text, it was copied in Staffordshire.
1992 "A linguistic atlas of Early Middle English: The value of texts surviving in more than one version", in: Matti Rissanen -- Ossi Ihalainen -- Tertu Nevalainen -- Irma Taavitsainen (eds.