lackey

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Synonyms for lackey

Synonyms for lackey

a male servant (especially a footman)

Related Words

a person who tries to please someone in order to gain a personal advantage

References in classic literature ?
It was bruited about outside still, on the authority of what the great lackey had told some great noble whom he favored, in confidence, that M.
That may be," said the Raven; "I did not examine him so minutely; but I know from my tame sweetheart, that when he came into the court-yard of the palace, and saw the body-guard in silver, the lackeys on the staircase, he was not the least abashed; he nodded, and said to them, 'It must be very tiresome to stand on the stairs; for my part, I shall go in.
It is not possible for you to enter the palace, for you are barefooted: the guards in silver, and the lackeys in gold, would not allow it; but do not cry, you shall come in still.
The repast was carried into effect that very day, and the lackey waited at table.
As for Aramis, of whom we believe we have sufficiently explained the character--a character which, like that of his lackey was called Bazin.
With regard to D'Artagnan, we know how he was lodged, and we have already made acquaintance with his lackey, Master Planchet.
And you," asked Porthos, "haven't you still in your service your old lackey, that good, that brave, that intelligent what, then, is his name?
Planchet -- yes, I have found him again, but he is lackey no longer.
When arrived at the stables, Raoul gave his horse to a little lackey, and sprang up the perron with an ardor that would have delighted the heart of his father.
If you marry expecting anything from yourself in the future, you will feel at every step that for you all is ended, all is closed except the drawing room, where you will be ranged side by side with a court lackey and an idiot
Directly he heard a low challenge from one of his sentries, who presently appeared escorting a lackey.
The lackey approached and handed Norman of Torn a dainty parchment sealed with scented wax wafers.
They fell in single file: first the lackey, Giles, then Norman of Torn and last the fellow whom he had addressed as Flory bearing the object covered with a cloth.
They drank--that is, Nathaniel Letton took mineral water served by the smoothly operating machine of a lackey who inhabited the place, while Dowsett took Scotch and soda and Daylight a cocktail.