laboursaving


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Synonyms for laboursaving

designed to replace or conserve human and especially manual labor

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References in periodicals archive ?
Metal-worker Elizabeth Merrell used the appliance of science to design the washing machine in 1859 Almost 150 years on, it remains a vital time and laboursaving device It has rid households of hours of drudgery.
In reality farmers are leaders in their field in the use of laboursaving devices and biotechnology.
By advocating laboursaving technology to assist women, she challenged existing assumptions about the low value of domestic work, and female labour in general.
Writing about the Industrial Revolution in Progress and Poverty in 1879, reformer Henry George observed that "at the beginning of this marvelous era it was natural to expect, and it was expected, that laboursaving inventions would lighten the toil and improve the condition of the labourer; that the enormous increase in the power of producing wealth would make real poverty a thing of the past.
But adoption of laboursaving technology is the definition of "progress"; granting and lending governments and institutions urge (or require) its adoption, and few resources have been put into developing capital-saving technologies.
Machines may be "wonderful" in their ability to perform laboursaving tasks, but they are not wonderful enough to drive the engine of history.
With pet owners finding themselves increasingly pressed for time, products that offer convenience and laboursaving advantages are witnessing the fastest year-on-year growth.
Now our resourceful tech team have shifted their focus to our cafe and front of house experience to find a laboursaving way of preparing food which is bound to be a real crowd pleaser too.
the Whizzing alongside them will be a laboursaving 1930s Fordson tractor doing the job in a fifth of the time.
The creation of the great Tyneside industrialist, inventor and innovator William (later Lord) Armstrong, the mock-Tudor mansion was not only the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity, but was crammed full of the sort of ingenious laboursaving gadgets we take for granted these days, from dishwashers to rotary spits, and even lifts.