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Synonyms for l

a metric unit of capacity, formerly defined as the volume of one kilogram of pure water under standard conditions

the cardinal number that is the product of ten and five

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a cgs unit of illumination equal to the brightness of a perfectly diffusing surface that emits or reflects one lumen per square centimeter

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being ten more than forty

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References in periodicals archive ?
Ombudsman Peter Tyndall upheld Mrs L's complaint that consideration of the referral by the POVA meetings was inadequate and that the findings should be set aside.
Six L's is marketing its Vintage Ripe tomatoes as a vine-ripened premium tomato with "authentic tomato flavor.
L does not intend to either support or further develop S's software products, and L's brand name is already more valuable than that of S, but L was willing to pay a high price for S because L wants S's customer list.
Also, Krieg said, he intends to introduce Lean Six Sigma techniques, a widely used business strategy, to further streamline AT & L's practices.
But the other L's get Tim into rehab and kick the Fab 5 all the way back to Manhattan.
Additionally, Image l's expandable architecture ensures that it is always ready to incorporate new technologies, such as HDTV.
Six L's Packing Company, one of the nation's largest tomato producers and a contractor for Taco Bell, pays its pickers 40 cents for every 32-pound bucket they bring in.
Six L's is marketing its potatoes in a newly designed bag that features high graphic product photography as well as cooking tips.
During his life, L's mother created various family trusts; L exercised a power of appointment over these and other trusts to create various new trusts (N).
l's application to downzone 10 blocks in the Seaport Historic District to C6-2A and not permit the destruction through high-rise development of the last vestiges of old New York, a neighborhood evoked by Herman Melville's opening passage in Moby Dick and celebrated by New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell in Up in the Old Hotel.