jargon

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Synonyms for jargon

Synonyms for jargon

a variety of a language that differs from the standard form

specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture

Synonyms for jargon

a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves)

a colorless (or pale yellow or smoky) variety of zircon

Synonyms

specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject

References in classic literature ?
of this formal jargon were all taken from the French language.
It is likewise to be observed, that this society has a peculiar cant and jargon of their own, that no other mortal can understand, and wherein all their laws are written, which they take special care to multiply; whereby they have wholly confounded the very essence of truth and falsehood, of right and wrong; so that it will take thirty years to decide, whether the field left me by my ancestors for six generations belongs to me, or to a stranger three hundred miles off.
The goatherds did not understand this jargon about squires and knights-errant, and all they did was to eat in silence and stare at their guests, who with great elegance and appetite were stowing away pieces as big as one's fist.
A diction that is made up of strange (or rare) terms is a jargon.
But Clara had not patience to hear any more of the unintelligible jargon which has got possession of the world to-day, much as Mr.
With this intent, he escorted me through the Taboo Groves, pointing out to my notice a variety of objects, and endeavoured to explain them in such an indescribable jargon of words, that it almost put me in bodily pain to listen to him.
Stuart and his comrades had not proceeded far in the canoes, when they beheld the whole rabble of Wishram stringing in groups along the bank, whooping and yelling, and gibbering in their wild jargon, and when they landed below the falls, they were surrounded by upwards of four hundred of these river ruffians, armed with bows and arrows, war clubs, and other savage weapons.
But now he can only whisper, and what he whispers sounds like what it is--mere jumble and jargon.
Occasionally, merely for the pleasure of being cruel, we put unoffending Frenchmen on the rack with questions framed in the incomprehensible jargon of their native language, and while they writhed we impaled them, we peppered them, we scarified them, with their own vile verbs and participles.