injustice


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  • noun

Synonyms for injustice

Synonyms for injustice

an act that is not just

Synonyms for injustice

the practice of being unjust or unfair

References in classic literature ?
In one point Professor Bumper had done his rival an injustice.
If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of the machine of government, let it go, let it go: perchance it will wear smooth--certainly the machine will wear out.
Yes, here she was, stranded with that deep injustice of hers torturing her poor torn heart.
They do not deny that the slaves are held as prop- erty; but that terrible fact seems to convey to their minds no idea of injustice, exposure to outrage, or savage barbarity.
Do not boast of it, however," said Elinor, "for it is injustice in both of you.
What a singularly deep impression her injustice seems to have made on your heart
Miss Cathy and he were now very thick; but Hindley hated him: and to say the truth I did the same; and we plagued and went on with him shamefully: for I wasn't reasonable enough to feel my injustice, and the mistress never put in a word on his behalf when she saw him wronged.
I won't do the lad's character the injustice of backing it at even money.
Why do I do myself the injustice of calling myself a girl?
It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.
You do me injustice,'' exclaimed the Templar fervently; ``I swear to you by the name which I bear by the cross on my bosom by the sword on my side by the ancient crest of my fathers do I swear, I will do thee no injury whatsoever
since it has fallen to thy lot to hold subject and submissive to thy full will and pleasure a knight so renowned as is and will be Don Quixote of La Mancha, who, as all the world knows, yesterday received the order of knighthood, and hath to-day righted the greatest wrong and grievance that ever injustice conceived and cruelty perpetrated: who hath to-day plucked the rod from the hand of yonder ruthless oppressor so wantonly lashing that tender child.
Do we suppose that principle, whatever it may be in man, which has to do with justice and injustice, to be inferior to the body?
It not only serves to moderate the immediate mischiefs of those which may have been passed, but it operates as a check upon the legislative body in passing them; who, perceiving that obstacles to the success of iniquitous intention are to be expected from the scruples of the courts, are in a manner compelled, by the very motives of the injustice they meditate, to qualify their attempts.
These must be chiefly, if not wholly, effects of the unsteadiness and injustice with which a factious spirit has tainted our public administrations.