inflect

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Related to inflective: inflexed
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Synonyms for inflect

conjugate

Synonyms for inflect

change the form of a word in accordance as required by the grammatical rules of the language

vary the pitch of one's speech

References in periodicals archive ?
Marsten-Wilson performed a study on four participants with semantic deficit, which found only one with irregular inflective impairment, which, they argued, would not be possible under the single-system theory.
Given that commodities are at a very speculative and inflective point right now, we want to play them from a trading-oriented perspective.
Non-terminal processes may be derivational, but also inflective, as in the inflection of drincan 'drink' for the past participle (druncen) as a prerequisite for obtaining druncennes 'drunkenness' by means of suffixation.
It is an inflective language with several analytical forms, three dialects, and German syntactical influence.
5) The suffix -hta is attached to a derived stem and followed by the reflexive inflective suffix -mei.
Tagging Inflective Languages: Prediction of Morphological Categories for a Rich, Structured Tagset.
I assume that conversion takes place from the more inflected to the less inflective class, that is, from nouns and adjectives to adverbs.
Planes affect and synthesise with each other based on inflective folding and refolding.
Wenger is careful to stress that his use of the term `practice' does not reflect the dichotomy that is traditionally made between the notions of `theory' and `practice', for practice is influenced by theory, and is also not an inherently inflective activity.
20) Friedrich Schlegel's definition of the most advanced 'inflective' languages had excluded the Hebrew (he claimed that the verbal roots of inflective languages consist of one syllable only; the Hebrew, by contrast, in his view was disyllabic).
In contrast, for example, to the Indo-European languages, which are inflective, Sumerian is agglutinative (i.
The trick is to read this book as if listening to Noah Adams the broadcaster, with his soft, resonant voice, earnest and sincere, never sickeningly inflective.