inferior court


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Synonyms for inferior court

any court whose decisions can be appealed to a higher court

References in periodicals archive ?
44) In contrast to Marbury, however, the court found that section 14 could be utilized in Bollman as a constitutional exercise of the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction because the writ sought "the revision of a decision of an inferior court.
31) Besides owing its allegiance to the district court, for it is from the district court that the bankruptcy court derives its authority to operate, (32) the bankruptcy court is clearly not the equal of the district court, but rather, is an inferior court.
62) Douglas's logic applies equally to the situation when an objection made in an inferior court would have been "patently futile" in light of binding appellate precedent that would have preordained an adverse ruling from the inferior court.
Although jurisdictional error was extremely narrow when it involved collateral review of a superior court judgment, the concept might have meant something "close[] to full review of the merits" when it involved review of an inferior court judgment.
Just as Section I provides that the federal judicial power "shall be vested (not may be vested)" in a supreme court and congressionally established inferior courts, Justice Story noted, it also provides that "[tlhe judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive, for their services, a compensation which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.
A section of the article now reads: "Since Article Il, Section 1 [of the Constitution] indicates that judicial power in addition to the Supreme Court's rests 'in such inferior courts as the Congress may .
1: The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.
Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution states, "The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour.
If allowed by the judicial conference, inferior courts may enact local rules as long as they do not affect any substantive rights or conflict with general law, or require payment of any cost or fee unless allowed by general law.
Hamilton's arguments ultimately carried the day, and life tenure was provided to judges of the "supreme and inferior Courts.
The relevant constitutional provision is Article III, Section I, which vests "the judicial power" in "one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as Congress from time to time may ordain and establish.
Article 80 contains a similar provision for the judges of ''the inferior courts.
The Supreme Court's mandate to the inferior courts was contained--obscurely, indirectly, and without any specific guidelines or instructions--in the final paragraph of the second Brown opinion, ordering a remand.
Since Article II, Section 1 indicates that judicial power in addition to the Supreme Court's rests "in such inferior courts as the Congress may .
Inferior courts, in general, are not judicially authorized to disregard the doctrine of the Supreme Court, even if those inferior courts think that doctrine is wrong, because the Constitution itself creates a structure of vertical authority.