incarceration


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Synonyms for incarceration

Synonyms for incarceration

References in periodicals archive ?
Parole supervision is much different than standard probation supervision, which rarely leads to incarceration for people who violate their terms.
As my colleagues and I were rising through the ranks of the federal prison system during the 1980s and 90s, we observed and discussed an intriguing phenomenon that "Children of the Prison Boom: Mass Incarceration and the Future of American Inequality" addresses in detail.
The incarceration rate of African Americans is nearly six times that of whites (NAACP Criminal Justice Fact Sheet; 2009-2016).
When it comes to America's high incarceration rate--now about five times what it was in 1970--there's the Standard Story, and then there's the truth.
Researchers found that when compared to no incarceration, incarceration for less than a month predicted subsequent depression symptoms, while incarceration of one to 12 months predicted worse subsequent health.
Excessive sentencing for minor crimes and our racially discriminatory "war on drugs" policies that began in the 1970s are largely to blame for the incarceration explosion.
Lynch views degradation as hardwired into the logics of modern incarceration and especially into the era of mass incarceration in Arizona.
The idea that mass incarceration damages neighborhoods does not seem so controversial today.
The move comes at a time when many federal government leaders are making attempts to reduce mass incarceration in the United States.
Synopsis: "Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People's Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time" by writer, researcher, teacher, and social justice advocate James Kilgore offers the first comprehensive overview of the incarceration apparatus put in place by the world's largest jailer: the United States.
This book offers the first comprehensive overview of the incarceration apparatus put in place by the world's largest jailer: the United States.
As a result, incarceration rates began an upward trajectory around 1975, then escalated sharply in the 1980s as part of the war on drugs.
Now it's mass incarceration that defines America as a society.
Volume 19 in the Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance series, this book takes a close look at global perspectives on punishment, with special attention paid to incarceration and prison conditions.