imprison

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Synonyms for imprison

Synonyms for imprison

to enclose so as to hinder or prohibit escape

Synonyms for imprison

confine as if in a prison

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References in periodicals archive ?
You don't actually now face an imprisonable offence.
To give one example: spitting in public in all civilized societies has traditionally been an almost imprisonable offense.
Others say that Asbos have simply targeted the poor and vulnerable in society, that large numbers of people have been imprisoned for breaching them, often for crimes that were not themselves imprisonable or for acts that were not even criminal.
Starting fires is technically an imprisonable offence in Lebanon, but this apparently served as little deterrent for farmers and other individuals who start small blazes as ways of clearing waste.
NZNO's submission was praised by labour MP Darien Fenton, who particularly commended the section opposing disentitlement of those injured while committing an imprisonable offence.
This legislation, which makes possession of inappropriate images an imprisonable offence, clearly demonstrates that deploying the most effective tools is now an essential element of a successful IT security policy both for the perimeter and within the network.
53) More significantly, in mid 2006, a new law was introduced that made the passage and exploitation of humans an imprisonable offense in the UAE.
Rachel's parents say careless driving should be made an imprisonable offence.
BUT until we stop urging seven-year-olds to "get stuck in" and "get it forward", until we stop allowing our promising teenagers to think they have made it and don't need to worry about focusing on further development of their game, until we make it an imprisonable offence to refer to the Premier League as the best league in the world, and until we stop believing all the hype, disappointments like Wednesday's will be experienced on a regular basis.
Anyone arrested for an imprisonable offence can have a sample taken without their consent.
Theft is an imprisonable offence, and in some cases people have been sent to jail for stealing energy.
Debt, for example, has long ceased to be an imprisonable offence in the West, yet less than 100 years ago the way that the West dealt with developing nations that had borrowed too much was to send in the troopssuch as when a coalition of European powers bombarded Caracas as recently as 1902, or when the US took military action in the Caribbean even more recently.
The Policy and Research Division of the former Department of Justice developed the Seriousness Scale (Spier Luketina & Kettles, 1991) that was used to determine maximum seriousness of offending for each offender in the study The Seriousness Scale ranks only imprisonable offences (non-imprisonable offences have a ranking of zero) The score assigned to each offence is the average number of days imprisonment imposed on every offender convicted of that offence between 1990 and 1994.
Michael Tonry, in his book Malign Neglect, extensively reviews the literature and concludes, with one important caveat, that "[f]rom every available data source, discounting to take account of their measurement and methodological limits, the evidence seems clear that the main reason that black incarceration rates are substantially higher than those for whites is that black crime rates for imprisonable crimes are substantially higher than those for whites.