immaterial

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Synonyms for immaterial

Synonyms for immaterial

not relevant or pertinent to the subject; not applicable

Synonyms for immaterial

of no importance or relevance especially to a law case

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without material form or substance

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not consisting of matter

not pertinent to the matter under consideration

(often followed by 'to') lacking importance

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References in periodicals archive ?
Idealism, also known as immaterialism and associated with the thought of George Berkeley, holds that only ideas are real; material objects are not, only our perceptions of them.
A further possibility for thinking of the nature of mind and its relation to the body is that found in the radical immaterialism that Bishop George Berkeley developed at the start of the 18th century.
Two Unsuccessful Arguments for Immaterialism, PETER DILLARD
Most importantly, the conceptual idealist shares Kant's aversion to any form of empirical idealism, such as Berkeley's immaterialism.
It might be thought, as it was by Guthrie (1965: 277) over forty years ago, that Anaxagoras was, unlike Empedocles and Democritus, pressing toward immaterialism but lacked the vocabulary to do so.
If Bishop Berkeley is taken as the model of idealism, as often seems to be the case among Anglophone philosophers, then idealists would seem to be committed to some combination of his two complementary theses of subjectivism and immaterialism.
Separate treatments of his theory of vision, doctrine of signs, argument for immaterialism, work on minds and agency, natural philosophy and philosophy of science, philosophy of mathematics, moral and political philosophy, economic writings, and writings on religion are then presented.
Though I play at the edges of knowing"), Oliver finds her bearings, not by looking at the self in the inherited egocentric sense of human as the central character, but rather by seeking out an immaterialism that is immersed in the material, a reality without surrendering all that is or makes an individual, a counter-stipulation where the self is not overcome by the world,/but through the world finds renewal: "to keep us from ever-darkness,/to ease us with warm touching,/to hold us in the great hands of light .
George Berkeley (1685-1753) was the English proponent of Idealism, a theory of immaterialism based on the premise that to exist is to be perceived.
5) Philosophically, Borges succeeds Berkeley and Schopenhauer (6) and he is generally very influenced by immaterialism and subjective idealism, according to which objective reality is nothing but an illusion (a fiction), which man cannot even comprehend completely: we perceive subjectively and from our own personal perspective, so the only thing we know is how we ourselves have perceived a phenomenon--and not how