hydrophytic


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Related to hydrophytic: mesophytic
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Words related to hydrophytic

growing wholly or partially in water

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Prevalence Indices are weighted averages that combine relative abundance and wetland indicator status categories in order to determine the prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation at a particular site (Peet et al.
Those plants that have adapted to growth in water or in soil, which is at least periodically saturated or inundated, are often referred to as hydrophytic plants, or simply hydrophytes (USACOE 1987).
No literature had made any mention of hydrophytic orchids.
The areal coverage of hydrophytic vegetation within functional wetlands ranged 0% to 100%, with a mean of 46 [+ or -] 34% (mean [+ or -] SD; Table 1).
Hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils, and periodic flooding are three characteristics of wetlands.
The term "wetland" except when such term is part of the term "converted wetland" means land that (A) has a predominance of hydric soils; (B) is inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions; and (C) under normal circumstances does support a prevalence of such vegetation.
The Phase 2 bottomland sites, on the other hand, were true wetlands, as evidenced by the hydrophytic vegetation and flooded or saturated soils noted during numerous field visits.
Wetlands are often identified and mapped using a mix of three criteria: hydrology, hydrophytic vegetation and hydric soils.
A wetland site 1) has a predominance of hydric soils; 2) is inundated or saturated by surface or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions; and 3) under normal circumstances does support a prevalence of such vegetation.
It has been previously determined that the area of study supports hydrophytic vegetation and has developed hydric soils; however, no investigations to date have determined the aerial extent or origin of the wetland area.
Areas that have a predominance of hydric soils and that are inundated or saturated by surface water or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of hydrophytic vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions.
The process varies depending on the characteristics of the land being converted, but it typically includes removing existing topsoil and replacing it with hydric soils, removing existing vegetation and replacing it with hydrophytic vegetation, and altering existing hydrology to create anaerobic conditions.
Wetlands are generally defined on the basis of hydric soil, hydrophytic vegetation, and hydrology.
Drepanoclados uncinatus is a hydrophytic (water-adapted) moss that is almost ubiquitous, as it can grow in lowland taiga and subalpine forests as well as in bogs.
These are soils which are inundated with water long enough during the growing season to create an anaerobic soil condition which stimulates growth of hydrophytic vegetation.