humour


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Synonyms for humour

Synonyms for humour

a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling

(Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state

the quality of being funny

Synonyms

Related Words

the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous

put into a good mood

Synonyms

References in classic literature ?
She saw that he wanted to engage her on the old subject of his grievances, and she was in no humour to indulge him.
If she had any sense of humour, it must amuse her that he should place her on a pedestal and worship her with such an honest idolatry, but even while she laughed she must have been pleased and touched.
Yet, in Every Man in His Humour there is at least one character worthy to live beside Shakespeare's, and that is the blustering, boastful Captain Bobadill.
When Every Man in His Humour was acted, Shakespeare took a part in it.
This was not the first time that Ben had been in prison, for soon after Every Man in His Humour was acted, he quarreled for some unknown reason with another actor.
As I often remark to the young ladies, "Well I must say, and I do not care who knows it, of all the ready humour--hem--I ever heard anywhere"--and I have heard a good deal; for when my dear brother was alive (I kept house for him, Miss Nickleby), we had to supper once a week two or three young men, highly celebrated in those days for their humour, Madame Mantalini-- "Of all the ready humour," I say to the young ladies, "I ever heard, Madame Mantalini's is the most remarkable--hem.
But though the quarrel was, in all appearance, perfectly reconciled, the good humour which had been interrupted by it, was by no means restored.
Although muffled up in divers coats and handkerchiefs--one of which, passed over his crown, and tied in a convenient crease of his double chin, secured his three-cornered hat and bob-wig from blowing off his head--there was no disguising his plump and comfortable figure; neither did certain dirty finger-marks upon his face give it any other than an odd and comical expression, through which its natural good humour shone with undiminished lustre.
Well,' said the locksmith bluntly, 'I think you'll have your humour.
The very intelligence that shone in her deep blue eye, and was stamped upon her noble head, seemed scarcely of her age, or of the world; and yet the changing expression of sweetness and good humour, the thousand lights that played about the face, and left no shadow there; above all, the smile, the cheerful, happy smile, were made for Home, and fireside peace and happiness.
I'm in a working humour now,' said Sally, 'so don't disturb me, if you please.
Did he say, for instance,' added Brass, in a kind of comfortable, cozy tone--'I don't assert that he did say so, mind; I only ask you, to refresh your memory--did he say, for instance, that he was a stranger in London--that it was not his humour or within his ability to give any references--that he felt we had a right to require them--and that, in case anything should happen to him, at any time, he particularly desired that whatever property he had upon the premises should be considered mine, as some slight recompense for the trouble and annoyance I should sustain--and were you, in short,' added Brass, still more comfortably and cozily than before, 'were you induced to accept him on my behalf, as a tenant, upon those conditions?
As it was clear that he was a choleric fellow in some respects, Mr Swiveller was relieved to find him in such good humour, and, to encourage him in it, smiled himself.
Let them know my humour,' said the single gentleman, rising.
WHEN mentally unstable people inflict their idea of humour on an unsuspecting world, the result is tragedy, and we have seen it happen in the shocking case of the death of an Indian nurse who answered a prank call from a Sydney radio station and shared information about the Duchess of Cambridge while she was admitted at a London hospital.