horse

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Synonyms for horse

horse around or about

Synonyms

Synonyms for horse

References in classic literature ?
said he; and by a prodigy of skill which this incomparable horseman alone was capable, he threw his horse forward to within ten paces of the white horse; already his hand was stretched out to seize his prey.
The white horse began to rattle in its throat; D'Artagnan gained upon him.
On the same principle the races are managed; the course is only two or three hundred yards long, the wish being to have horses that can make a rapid dash.
When I remonstrated that it was a pity, for the horse was quite exhausted, he cried out, "Why not?
Rostov without hearing Boris to the end spurred his horse.
said Boris, thinking Rostov had said "His Highness," and pointing to the Grand Duke who with his high shoulders and frowning brows stood a hundred paces away from them in his helmet and Horse Guards' jacket, shouting something to a pale, white uniformed Austrian officer.
Because these horses are not to be sold," was the reply.
But, sir," answered the steward, "do you know that these horses belong to Monsieur de Montbazon?
I know I'm not much account; but I'm the only horse in all the Land of Oz, so they treat me with great respect.
You may be an imitation of a horse, but you're a mighty poor one.
In an encampment, however, of such fancied security as that in which Captain Bonneville found his Indian friends, much of these precautions with respect to their horses are omitted.
One object of Captain Bonneville in wintering among these Indians was to procure a supply of horses against the spring.
Ginger and I were not of the regular tall carriage horse breed, we had more of the racing blood in us.
And the horse really did not lose the road but followed its windings, turning now to the right and now to the left and sensing it under his feet, so that though the snow fell thicker and the wind strengthened they still continued to see way-marks now to the left and now to the right of them.
Snodgrass, when the horse had executed this manoeuvre for the twentieth time.