heavier-than-air


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Related to heavier-than-air: Heavier-than-air flight
  • adj

Words related to heavier-than-air

relating to an aircraft heavier than the air it displaces

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References in periodicals archive ?
The stamp commemorates the 100th anniversary of the First controlled, powered, sustained flight in a heavier-than-air flying machine.
did not possess a single battle-worthy aircraft and had to borrow airplanes from other countries to permit our heavier-than-air arm to participate.
Orville Wright distrusted Selfridge because of his association with Bell and rival Glenn Curtiss, but asked him to fly because he was a member of the aeronautical board that supervised the heavier-than-air tests.
Although he would have preferred to continue experimenting with dirigibles, a growing worldwide interest in the possibilities of flight in heavier-than-air machines inevitably captured his attention.
appeared decidedly unfavorable for flying -- especially for attempting the first flight in a heavier-than-air, powered and manned plane.
American history is littered with stories of the dubious and the doubtful, like Lord Kelvin, who predicted that heavier-than-air flight was impossible eight years before the Wright brothers soared at Kitty Hawk.
Existing communications satellites, manned aircraft and heavier-than-air fixed-wing unmanned aircraft address some of the need for aerial surveillance, but are limited in their capabilities-and also may be too expensive or use up too many resources.
and foreign governments, the court battles over patent infringements, the business ventures, and the decades-long refusal of the Smithsonian Institution to recognize the Wrights as the inventors of the first machine capable of manned, sustained, heavier-than-air flight.
The exhaust system is designed to remove heated vapors and air as well as heavier-than-air solvent vapors.
The Wright Flyer built by Orville and Wilbur Wright was the first to achieve what had previously been only dreamed about or sketched on paper: a successful flight of a heavier-than-air craft powered by an internal combustion engine.
The Barling's wingspan of 120 feet (the exact distance of the first sustained heavier-than-air flight and longer than the B-17's wingspan of 104 feet) made it unwieldy and underpowered, yet it needed only 320 yards to take off.
Jansen is among six Test Pilot School students who can boast of knowing how the world's first piloted, heavier-than-air craft handled: not well.
A pair of inventive brothers also soared here, flying above the ground--for a few moments, at least--in the first heavier-than-air machine.
It sails so far that it holds the world record for the longest flight -- 1,046 feet, 11 inches -- by a thrown, heavier-than-air object.
During this 100th anniversary celebration of the Wright Brothers' successful flight of a heavier-than-air craft on December 17, 1903, it is significant that we are participating in another milestone in aviation history," said Craig Arnold, senior vice president and group executive for Eaton's Fluid Power business.