hat

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Synonyms for hat

References in classic literature ?
His hat tumbled to the carpet, his heavy umbrella slipped between his knees with a thud; he reached after the one and ducked after the other, but with an unimpaired smile on his round face spoke simultaneously as follows:
He placed the hat upon the glass floor, made a pass with his hand, and then removed the hat, displaying a little white piglet no bigger than a mouse, which began to run around here and there and to grunt and squeal in a tiny, shrill voice.
In a glossy new hat and a pair of trousers with a fold down the front (carefully preserved by keeping them under the bed--I don't mean on the floor, you know, but between the bed and the mattress), I felt I was somebody and that there were other washerwomen: ay, and even other girls to love, and who would perhaps appreciate a clever, good-looking young fellow.
It was putting flowers on your hat at all, no matter what color they were, that was ridiculous.
Smauker, my lad, your fin,' said the gentleman with the cocked hat.
Arnold twisted the traveling hat which Blanche had thrown to him, nervously, in both hands.
On him the cocked hat, gold-laced coat, and staff, had all three descended.
Alec would have reached the Point first, if Rose, in her flurry, had not retarded him by jerking the rudder ropes in a most unseamanlike way, and just as she got right again her hat blew off.
The coachman making no reply, and plainly declining to enter into any controversy on a subject so far removed from his sympathies and feelings, another passenger says, 'Yes, sir;' and the gentleman in the straw hat in acknowledgment of his courtesy, says 'Yes, sir,' to him, in return.
He brought round both hat and goose to me on Christmas morning, knowing that even the smallest problems are of interest to me.
She drew on her gloves, and Robert picked up his hat.
And Curdken went on telling the king what had happened upon the meadow where the geese fed; how his hat was blown away; and how he was forced to run after it, and to leave his flock of geese to themselves.
So he went with him, and, not long afterwards, they met a man who wore a little hat, but he had it slouched over one ear.
said Kit, laying aside his hat with a weary air and sighing as he spoke.
Smiling, he stared at the feather in the princess's hat, and then about him as though he were going to pick something up.