half-timber


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Related to half-timber: Fachwerk
  • adj

Synonyms for half-timber

having exposed wood framing with spaces filled with masonry, as in Tudor architecture

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References in periodicals archive ?
The Tudor half-timber building on Westgate has fallen into disrepair in recent years, with peeling paint and rotting oak panels.
The town lies below Edward I's castle, built to control the River Severn valley and crossing - a major route into mid Wales After the Norman Conquests the French aristocrat Roger de Montgomery (1030-1094) was given the job of administering the vital Welsh Marches The town was sacked at the beginning of the 15th century by rebel Welsh prince Owain Glynd3/4r The castle was besieged during the English Civil War when 3,000 parliamentary soldiers defeated 5,000 royalists under Lord Byron Many of the town's houses are half-timber - black and white - in style
Building exteriors include multidimensional facades, richly textured with steep pitched roofs, tall chimneys, cut stone, and stucco with half-timber details.
John Betjeman described this South Shropshire town as 'a long, airy, curving street of brick Georgian houses and shops interspersed with genuine half-timber, the Rea brook making a splash at the bottom of the hill.
The E series engines were replaced by the new overhead valve Austin unit in 1952, the classic and most desirable Morris Minor arrived the following year, the half-timber Traveller estate.
The E series engines were replaced by the new overhead valve Austin unit in 1952, then the classic and most desirable Morris Minor arrived the following year, the half-timber Traveller estate.
Records show that the first school building on Church Street, called the Pedagogue's House, was commissioned by the town's Guild of the Holy Cross, and the wood for its half-timber walls - which are still there today - cost 45 shillings (pounds 2.
Photo: In Strasbourg square, Germanic influences show in wood balconies, half-timber, high roofs; French, in shuttered windows, mansard roofs.